EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

French hyène.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hyen (plural hyens)

  1. (obsolete) A hyena.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for hyen in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hīgian, from Proto-Germanic *hīgōną.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhiːən/, /ˈhɛi̯ən/

VerbEdit

hyen (third-person singular simple present hyeth, present participle hyynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle hyed)

  1. to hie (travel at great speed or with great haste)
  2. to do with haste or speedily; to do when needed
  3. to do with care or fervour; to make a earnest attempt
  4. to make fast; to hurry or expedite someone (including oneself)
  5. (figuratively) to disappear; to pass away
ConjugationEdit
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: hie
  • Scots: hie

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

hyen (plural hyenen)

  1. Alternative form of hyne (household)

Etymology 3Edit

AdverbEdit

hyen

  1. Alternative form of henne (hence)

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

hyen (third-person singular simple present hyeth, present participle hyynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle hyed)

  1. Alternative form of heien (to lift up)

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hýði.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hyen n (definite hyene, dative hyenen)

  1. (botany) film between shell and kernel