FalaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese dizer (to say), from Latin dīcō (I say; I tell), from Proto-Indo-European *deyḱ- (to show, point out). Genetically close to Portuguese dizer and Galician dicir, but shares more areal features with Extremaduran izil.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Mañego, Lagarteiru) IPA(key): /iˈðel/
  • (Valverdeiru) IPA(key): /iˈθel/

VerbEdit

idel

  1. to say; to tell
    • 2000, Domingo Frades Gaspar, Vamus a falal: Notas pâ coñocel y platical en nosa fala, Editora regional da Extremadura, Chapter 3: Radós:
      A radón mais grandi pa defendela é que é nossa LENGUA MATERNA, a “primeira lengua que un indivíduu aprendi de maneira ínnconscienti duranti a sua infancia” i en ela han aprindiu a idel as primeiras palabras []
      The greatest reason to defend it is that it is our NATIVE LANGUAGE, the “first language that an individual learns in an unconscious manner during his infancy” and in it learned how to say his first words []

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *īdalaz. Cognate with Old Frisian īdel, Old Saxon īdal, Dutch ijdel, Old High German ītal.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

īdel

  1. empty, void; bereft
    īdelhendeempty-handed
  2. worthless, useless, vain
    īdelblissvain joy
    īdelġielpvain glory, arrogance
    īdelsprǣċeidle-speaking, talkative

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: idle

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

idel

  1. empty, void

SynonymsEdit

AdverbEdit

idel

  1. just, only

SynonymsEdit


West FrisianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

idel

  1. vain, abortive (coming to naught, failing in its effect)

InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Further readingEdit

  • idel”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011