incense

See also: incensé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English encens, from Old French encens (sweet-smelling substance) from Late Latin incensum (burnt incense, literally something burnt), neuter past participle of incendō (I set on fire). Compare incendiary. Cognate with Spanish encender and incienso.

PronunciationEdit

  • Noun:
    • enPR: ĭn'sĕns, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɛns/
    • (file)
  • Verb:

NounEdit

 
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incense (countable and uncountable, plural incenses)

  1. A perfume used in the rites of various religions.
  2. (figuratively) Homage; adulation.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

incense (third-person singular simple present incenses, present participle incensing, simple past and past participle incensed)

  1. (transitive) To anger or infuriate.
    I think it would incense him to learn the truth.
  2. (archaic) To incite, stimulate.
  3. (transitive) To offer incense to.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To perfume with, or as with, incense.
  5. (obsolete) To set on fire; to inflame; to kindle; to burn.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

incēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of incēnsus

ReferencesEdit

  • incense in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • incense in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • incense in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • incense in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • incense in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers