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See also: incensé

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English encens, from Old French encens (sweet-smelling substance) from Late Latin incensum (burnt incense, literally something burnt), neuter past participle of incendō (I set on fire). Compare incendiary. Cognate with Spanish encender and incienso.

PronunciationEdit

  • Noun:
    • enPR: ĭn'sĕns, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɛns/
    • (file)
  • Verb:

NounEdit

 
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incense (countable and uncountable, plural incenses)

  1. A perfume used in the rites of various religions.
  2. (figuratively) Homage; adulation.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

incense (third-person singular simple present incenses, present participle incensing, simple past and past participle incensed)

  1. (transitive) To anger or infuriate.
    I think it would incense him to learn the truth.
  2. (archaic) To incite, stimulate.
  3. (transitive) To offer incense to.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To perfume with, or as with, incense.
    • Marston
      Incensed with wanton sweetes.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      Neither, for the future, shall any man or woman, self-styled noble, be incensed, — foolishly fumigated with incense, in Church; as the wont has been.
  5. (obsolete) To set on fire; to inflame; to kindle; to burn.
    • Chapman
      Twelve Trojan princes wait on thee, and labour to incense / Thy glorious heap of funeral.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

incense

  1. vocative masculine singular of incensus

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

incense

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of incensar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of incensar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of incensar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of incensar.