indoles

See also: índoles

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Plural of indole.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

indoles

  1. plural of indole

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin indolēs (inborn quality, nature), from indu- (within, in) + ol- (to grow) (an affix also found in abolish and adolescent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

indoles (uncountable)

  1. Natural disposition; innate character; unalterable intrinsic traits and qualities (collectively).[1]
    • 1673, Obadiah Walker, Of education, especially of young gentlemen, page 93:
      He must be treated as the Brachmans did their children, whose indoles they disliked.
    • 1677, Sir Matthew Hale, The primitive origination of mankind, page 160:
      Such is the indoles of the Humane Nature, where it is not strangely over-grown with Barbarousness.
    • 1882 July, in The Quarterly Review, page 214:
      Every language has its own ‘indoles’.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Oxford English Dictionary (2007)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From indu- (in) + *olēs (growth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

indolēs f (genitive indolis); third declension

  1. innate or inborn quality; nature
  2. natural ability; talent

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative indolēs indolēs
Genitive indolis indolium
Dative indolī indolibus
Accusative indolem indolēs
indolīs
Ablative indole indolibus
Vocative indolēs indolēs

DescendantsEdit

  • Italian: indole
  • Portuguese: índole
  • Spanish: índole

ReferencesEdit