Open main menu

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from Middle English infixed, stuck in, from Latin infixus, past participle of infigere, to fasten in.

PronunciationEdit

Noun
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɪnfɪks/
  • (file)
Verb

VerbEdit

infix (third-person singular simple present infixes, present participle infixing, simple past and past participle infixed)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To set; to fasten or fix by piercing or thrusting in.
    to infix a sting, spear, or dart
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, King John, Act II, Scene 1,[1]
      [] in her eye I find
      A wonder, or a wondrous miracle,
      The shadow of myself form’d in her eye:
      Which being but the shadow of your son,
      Becomes a sun and makes your son a shadow:
      I do protest I never loved myself
      Till now infixed I beheld myself
      Drawn in the flattering table of her eye.
    • 1700, John Dryden, Palamon and Arcite: or, The Knight’s Tale, from Chaucer, Book 1, in Fables, Ancient and Modern, London: Jacob Tonson, p. 11,[2]
      The fatal Dart a ready Passage found,
      And deep within his Heart infix’d the Wound:
    • 1779, David Hume, Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, Part 10, p. 100,[3]
      Consider that innumerable race of insects, which either are bred on the body of each animal, or flying about infix their stings in him.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, Chapter 41,[4]
      Gnawed within and scorched without, with the infixed, unrelenting fangs of some incurable idea; such an one, could he be found, would seem the very man to dart his iron and lift his lance against the most appalling of all brutes.
  2. (transitive) To instill.
  3. (transitive, linguistics) To insert a morpheme inside an existing word.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

infix (plural infixes)

  1. (linguistics) A morpheme inserted inside an existing word, such as -bloody- in English.
  2. (linguistics, proscribed) A morpheme that always appears between other morphemes in a word, such as -i- and -o- in English.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin īnfixus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

infix m (plural infixos)

  1. (linguistics) infix

Old OccitanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

infix (feminine infixa)

  1. stuck, broken

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French infixe, from Latin infixus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

infix n (plural infixe)

  1. infix

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

NounEdit

infix n

  1. (linguistics) infix