English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
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Adopted from Latin -o-, originating ultimately from Ancient Greek -ό- (-ó-) and -ο- (-o-). In English, the connective is found from the Middle English period in direct borrowings from Latin. Direct formations of English terms with the connective, always combining Greek or Latin roots, appear from the 16th or 17th century. From the 18th century, the suffix becomes productive in compounds where the second element is English. From about 1800, formations on all sorts of stems become common.

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. A linking vowel inserted interconsonantally between two morphemes, to ease pronunciation, without contributing to the meaning. It frequently joins words or combining forms of Ancient Greek or Classical Latin origin in the classical compounds of New Latin and international scientific vocabulary, but it can also be used to join modern terms and even abbreviations, either formally or informally.
    extreme + -o- + -phile producing extremophile
    blog + -o- + -sphere producing blogosphere
    speed + -o- + meter producing speedometer
    sadism + -o- + masochism producing sadomasochism
    smell + -o- + vision producing smell-o-vision
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Designated in the USAN guidelines for non-proprietary names of monoclonal antibodies.

Affix edit

-o-

  1. (pharmacology) a monoclonal antibody derived from a murine source
Related terms edit
  • -mab is the base suffix common to all monoclonal antibodies. (See that entry for full paradigm.)
References edit
  • USP Dictionary of USAN and International Drug Names, U.S. Pharmacopeia, 2000

Further reading edit

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech -o-, from Proto-Slavic *-o-.

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. forms compounds

Derived terms edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. -o-

Derived terms edit

German edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. -o-

Derived terms edit

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. A suffix-initial vowel (or linking vowel) inserted interconsonantally between the word stem and the suffix, to ease pronunciation, without contributing to the meaning.
    kor (age) + ‎-o- + -k → ‎korok (ages)

See also edit

Kashubian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-. Compare Slovincian -ɵ-

Pronunciation edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. used to link two words in some compounds; -o-

Derived terms edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Adopted from the thematic vowel in Ancient Greek -ο- (-o-) and -ό- (-ó-), often used to form nominal compounds. In Ancient Greek, the connective suffix originates in compounds where the first member is thematic, such as δημοκρατία (dēmokratía), but was extended by analogy to other stems, such as μητρόπολις (mētrópolis). The suffix was borrowed as a connective into Latin, mainly in compounds of Greek origin.

The suffix becomes productive and forms new compounds in learned humanist Latin, from the Renaissance. The connective is especially productive in connecting ethnonyms or geographical terms; genuine Greek stems include Gallo-, and Syro-, but most are of medieval or modern origin, productive from the 15th century, such as Anglo-, Graeco- or Latino-.

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. (post-classical Latin) Suffix forming nominal compounds (such as anglosaxonicus (Anglo-Saxon), from Anglus (Angle, English) and saxonicus (Saxon)).

Derived terms edit

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-

Pronunciation edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. used in compound words

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Polish: -o-
  • Silesian: -o-

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish -o-, from Proto-Slavic *-o-

Pronunciation edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. used in compound words
    deszcz + ‎-o- + ‎mierzyć → ‎deszczomierz

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Romanian edit

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. -o-

Derived terms edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-

Interfix edit

-o- (Cyrillic spelling -о-)

  1. Interfix used for forming nominal compounds.
    kiš + -o- + -brankȉšobrān

Derived terms edit

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. Used to form compounds.

Derived terms edit

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. Used to form compounds.

Derived terms edit

Swahili edit

Infix edit

-o-

  1. infixed form of -o (wa class(II), m class(III), and u class(XI) relative marker)

See also edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish -u, -o, from the Old Swedish genitive form of Germanic feminine ōn-stems.

Alternates with -u- according to Old Swedish rules of syllable weight, where -o was used after heavy syllables and -u after light.

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. Genitival interfix used to link elements in some compounds.

Usage notes edit

  • Used as interfix in compounds with certain old weak feminines ending in -a. Some common ones are hälsa (health), e.g. hälsocentral (health center); kvinna (woman), e.g. kvinnoorganisation (women's organisation); känsla (feeling), e.g. känsloliv (emotional life); vecka (week), e.g. veckodag (day of the week); vila (rest), e.g. vilopuls (resting heart rate); lära (teaching, theory), e.g. läromedel (teaching aids); föda (food, diet), e.g. födoämne (foodstuff); människa (human), e.g. människovärde (human dignity); saga (tale), e.g. sagobok (storybook), etc.
  • Alternates with a zero interfix (vowel deletion) in some words, cf. kyrkogård (churchyard), but kyrktorn (church tower); kronofogde (enforcement officer), but kronblad (petal).
  • The interfix was formerly mostly confined to the written literary language, whereas the spoken colloquial language preferred compounds with no -o- or with -e- in some dialects, but forms with -o- are now common in the spoken language, and formerly colloquial pronunciations such as körrgård for kyrkogård are today less common.

Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

  • Teleman, Ulf; Hellberg, Staffan; Andersson, Erik & Holm, Lisa (1999). Svenska akademiens grammatik 2 Ord. Stockholm: Svenska akad.
  • Wessén, Elias (1958). Svensk språkhistoria. 2, Ordbildningslära. 3. ed. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell

Upper Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *-o-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔ/
  • Syllabification: -o-

Interfix edit

-o-

  1. used in compound words
    horni + ‎-o- + ‎serbšćina → ‎hornjoserbšćina

Derived terms edit