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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin jugulāris, from Latin iugulum (neck, throat), from iugum (yoke), from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdʒʌɡ.jʊ.lə/, /ˈdʒʌɡ.jə.lə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdʒʌɡ.jʊ.lɚ/, /ˈdʒʌɡ.jə.lɚ/
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AdjectiveEdit

jugular (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, or located near, the neck or throat.
  2. (zoology, of fish) Having ventral fins attached under the throat.
  3. (humorous) Relating to juggling.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

jugular (plural jugulars)

  1. (anatomy) A jugular vein.
  2. (by extension) Any critical vulnerability.
    It was vicious; he went for the jugular.
    • 2001, Joyce Carol Oates, Middle Age : A Romance, paperback edition, Fourth Estate, page 83:
      One of Lionel's old Salthill friends with whom he exchanged perhaps a dozen words a year, and with whom he sometimes played squash, and tennis, both men killers on the court, seeking the jugular [] .

Usage notesEdit

The plural form jugulars is almost never used.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin or Scientific Latin iugularis, jugularis, from Latin iugulum.

AdjectiveEdit

jugular m or f (plural jugulares, comparable)

  1. jugular (relating to the neck or throat)

NounEdit

jugular f (plural jugulares)

  1. jugular vein

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French jugulaire, Medieval Latin or Scientific Latin iugularis, jugularis, from Latin iugulum.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jugular m or n (feminine singular jugulară, masculine plural jugulari, feminine and neuter plural jugulare)

  1. jugular; pertaining to the neck or throat

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit