See also: KED and keď

EnglishEdit

 
Melophagus ovinus
 
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Wikispecies

Alternative formsEdit

  • kade (specifically Melophagus ovinus)

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ked (plural keds)

  1. Any of the family Hippoboscidae of obligate parasites, especially the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus.
    • 1839, Rev. Dr Singer, Flies and other insects hurtful to live stock, &c., Transactions of the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland, page 132,
      Pouring with tobacco liquor is fatal to these insects, and also to the ked, Hippobosca ovina, and to the tick, Acarus reduvius, if it fairly reach them.
    • 2006, Philip R. Scott, Sheep Medicine, page 263,
      The common differential diagnoses include cutaneous myiasis, sheep scab and lice; however, keds are readily visible to the naked eye. [] Adult keds are 4-6 mm long, dark red and readily visible on the neck and forelimbs.
    • 2007, Carrie Gleason, The Biography of Wool, page 12,
      They watch the sheep for signs of insects or pests, such as sheep keds and sheep lice, that can irritate the sheep causing them to scratch their fleece against fences or troughs and damage or tear the wool.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish keed, possibly from Proto-Germanic *kaibaz (crooked), cf. Norwegian Nynorsk keiv (wry, wrong, left), keive (left hand), German Low German keef (tired). The adjective has forms with -w in Danish dialects of Jutland and Bornholm. Possibly the standard form kēð arose in the syntagm led og ked.

The adjective is derived from the verb *kībaną (to quarrel), cf. Danish kives, German keifen, and Dutch kijven.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ked (neuter ked, plural and definite singular attributive kede, comparative mere ked, superlative (predicative) mest ked, superlative (attributive) mest kede)

  1. tired (of), sorry (about).
Usage notesEdit
  1. In the modern language almost exclusively construed with the preposition af (of) and either the pronoun det (it) or a subclause (to the extent that the preposition is included in the substandard derivation ked-af-det-hed (sadness)).
ReferencesEdit

ked” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ked

  1. imperative of kede

DâwEdit

ParticleEdit

ked

  1. in (something hollow); locative marker used to indicate position inside something hollow such as a canoe
    xoo-ked : in a canoe

ReferencesEdit

  • Language at Large: Essays on Syntax and Semantics (Aikhenvald, Dixon), citing Martins (1994)

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably inherited from Proto-Ugric *kᴕ̈ntɜ; see also at kedv.[1]

NounEdit

ked (plural kedek)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of kedv (mood).
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ked kedek
accusative kedet kedeket
dative kednek kedeknek
instrumental keddel kedekkel
causal-final kedért kedekért
translative keddé kedekké
terminative kedig kedekig
essive-formal kedként kedekként
essive-modal
inessive kedben kedekben
superessive keden kedeken
adessive kednél kedeknél
illative kedbe kedekbe
sublative kedre kedekre
allative kedhez kedekhez
elative kedből kedekből
delative kedről kedekről
ablative kedtől kedektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
kedé kedeké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
kedéi kedekéi
Possessive forms of ked
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. kedem kedeim
2nd person sing. keded kedeid
3rd person sing. kede kedei
1st person plural kedünk kedeink
2nd person plural kedetek kedeitek
3rd person plural kedük kedeik
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See kegyelmed.

NounEdit

ked

  1. (obsolete) Syncopic form of kegyelmed (your mercy, your clemency, archaic)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ked
accusative kedet
dative kednek
instrumental keddel
causal-final kedért
translative keddé
terminative kedig
essive-formal kedként
essive-modal
inessive kedben
superessive keden
adessive kednél
illative kedbe
sublative kedre
allative kedhez
elative kedből
delative kedről
ablative kedtől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
kedé
non-attributive
possessive - plural
kedéi
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #1789 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary.

Further readingEdit

(mood):

  • ked in Czuczor, Gergely and János Fogarasi: A magyar nyelv szótára (’A Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Pest: Emich Gusztáv Magyar Akadémiai Nyomdász, 1862–1874.
  • Mentioned at kedély in Benkő, Loránd, ed. A magyar nyelv történeti-etimológiai szótára I–IV. (“The Historical-Etymological Dictionary of the Hungarian Language”). Budapest: Akadémiai, 1967–1984. →ISBN. Vol. 1: A–Gy (1967), vol. 2: H–O (1970), vol. 3: Ö–Zs (1976), vol. 4: index (1984).

(your mercy):

  • ked , redirecting to kegyelmed in Czuczor, Gergely and János Fogarasi: A magyar nyelv szótára (’A Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Pest: Emich Gusztáv Magyar Akadémiai Nyomdász, 1862–1874.
  • 14 examples for ked (your mercy) at entries in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’An Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

ked

  1. past participle of kiþen

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of kedja.

NounEdit

ked c

  1. (archaic) chain
DeclensionEdit
Declension of ked 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ked keden keder kederna
Genitive keds kedens keders kedernas

Etymology 2Edit

Derived from Middle Low German keef, further origin disputed.

AdjectiveEdit

ked (not comparable)

  1. (Southern) sick and tired
    vara ked på någon
    be sick and tired of someone

ReferencesEdit