See also: lāču

LatinEdit

NounEdit

lacū

  1. ablative singular of lacus

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *laku, from Proto-Germanic *lakō, from Proto-Germanic *lakjaną (to water, wet, irrigate, drain), causative of Proto-Germanic *lekaną (to leak, drain), from Proto-Indo-European *leǵ- (to leak).

Cognate with Old Saxon laca (in placenames, lake, stream, brook), Old Norse lækr (slow flowing stream), Old English leċċan (to make wet, moisten), Old Norse leka (to drip, leak). Maybe related to Old High German lacha (pool, water collected in a ditch, swamp), Middle Dutch lāke (pond, lake, stream, brook), Middle Low German lāke (water pooled in a riverbed), which could also be borrowed from lacus (lake, basin, tank). More at leak.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lacu f

  1. pool, pond
  2. expanse of water, lake
  3. stream, watercourse

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: lake

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ lake, n.3.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2021.

Further readingEdit


SakizayaEdit

NounEdit

lacu

  1. ammunition

SicilianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus, from Proto-Italic *lakus, from Proto-Indo-European *lókus (lake, pool).

NounEdit

lacu m

  1. lake