See also: Lak, lák, łąk, läk-, la̍k, -lak, Łąk, and лак

EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

lak (not comparable)

  1. Eye dialect spelling of like, representing African-American Vernacular English.

ConjunctionEdit

-

  1. Eye dialect spelling of like, representing African-American Vernacular English.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *lak-, from Proto-Indo-European *lh2k- (twisted; twig, sprig (as a loop)). Cognate to Latin lax (bait, lure, noose, slip), laqueus (cord, rope (as noose, slip)).

NounEdit

lak m

  1. chain (trap for wild animals)
  2. noose
  3. snare
  4. slip
  5. knot

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lak m

  1. lacquer

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lak c or n (singular definite lakken or lakket, plural indefinite lakker, plural definite lakkerne)

  1. lacquer

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lɑk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑk

Etymology 1Edit

First occurring in the late 16th century. Probably borrowed from French laque, ultimately from Persian لاک(lāk), from Hindi लाख (lākh), from Sanskrit लाक्षा (lākṣā).

NounEdit

lak m or f or n (plural lakken, diminutive lakje n)

  1. lacquer
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lak m or n (uncountable)

  1. foolery, foolishness, nonsense
    • 1859, "Wijsgeerig A. B. C.: H. Huisbaas", Humoristisch Album, H. Nijgh, page 59.
      [] Wie om reparatie malen / Heeft hij spoedig in zijn zak; / Zelf zal hij er niet naar talen -- / Wat hij toezegt is slechts lak; / Er is niets van hem te halen, / Zelfs al zat men zonder dak.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  2. indifference (only in lak hebben aan)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Dutch lac.

NounEdit

lak m or n (plural lakken)

  1. (dialectal) defect, deficiency, shortcoming, blame, blemish
Related termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle Dutch lac.

NounEdit

lak n (plural lakken)

  1. (archaic) lake
    Synonym: meer

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *lakka (cover, roof, shelter).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lak (plural lakok)

  1. (poetic) dwelling
    • 1843, Sándor Petőfi, Távolból (From a Distance), poem lines 1–2 [1]
      Kis lak áll a nagy Duna mentében;
      Oh mi drága e lakocska nékem!
      A small house stands along the big Danube;
      Oh how dear this tiny house is to me!
    • 1872, Mór Jókai, Az arany ember,[2] part 1, chapter 7. Translation: 1888 / 2010, by Mrs. Hegan Kennard, Timar's Two Worlds.[3]
      Timár a rejtett tanya felé irányozta lépteit. A virágoskerten keresztül már látszott valami út, mely a lakhoz vezet, csakhogy azt is úgy belepte a fű, hogy a rajta járó lépése nem okozott dobajt; egész nesztelenül juthatott el a kis verandáig.
      Timar turned his steps toward the creeper-covered cottage. Through the flower-garden a path led to the house, but so covered with grass that his steps were not heard, and he could thus get as far as the little veranda quite noiselessly.

DeclensionEdit

See this reference site for the possessive declensions [4]

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative lak lakok
accusative lakot lakokat
dative laknak lakoknak
instrumental lakkal lakokkal
causal-final lakért lakokért
translative lakká lakokká
terminative lakig lakokig
essive-formal lakként lakokként
essive-modal
inessive lakban lakokban
superessive lakon lakokon
adessive laknál lakoknál
illative lakba lakokba
sublative lakra lakokra
allative lakhoz lakokhoz
elative lakból lakokból
delative lakról lakokról
ablative laktól lakoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
laké lakoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
lakéi lakokéi
Possessive forms of lak
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. lakom lakaim
lakjaim
2nd person sing. lakod lakaid
lakjaid
3rd person sing. laka
lakja
lakai
lakjai
1st person plural lakunk lakaink
lakjaink
2nd person plural lakotok lakaitok
lakjaitok
3rd person plural lakuk
lakjuk
lakaik
lakjaik

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #451 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lak n (genitive singular laks, nominative plural lök)

  1. sheet, bedsheet

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

lak

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative of leka
    Vatnið lak úr vaskinum.
    The water leaked from the sink.

LuoEdit

NounEdit

lak (plural lake)

  1. tooth

Min NanEdit

For pronunciation and definitions of lak – see (“to fall; to drop; to leave out; etc.”).
(This character, lak, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of .)

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lak m inan

  1. sealing wax
  2. wallflower (Erysimum)
  3. dental sealant

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

lak f

  1. genitive plural of laka

Further readingEdit

  • lak in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit लक्ष (lakṣa)

NumeralEdit

lak

  1. hundred thousand

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *lьgъkъ, from pre-Slavic *h₁ln̥gʷʰ-u-ko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lȁk (definite lȁkī, comparative lȁkšī, Cyrillic spelling ла̏к)

  1. easy
  2. light
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From German Lack, from Italian lacca.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lȁk m (Cyrillic spelling ла̏к)

  1. lacquer
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

lak (nominative plural laks)

  1. lake

DeclensionEdit


WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lacus, from Proto-Indo-European *lakw- (lake, pool).

NounEdit

lak m (plural laks)

  1. lake

SynonymsEdit