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See also: Leite and léite

Contents

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese leite, from Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leite m (plural leites)

  1. milk

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

leite

  1. First-person singular present of leiten.
  2. Imperative singular of leiten.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of leiten.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of leiten.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish littiu f (porridge, gruel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leite f (genitive singular leitean)

  1. porridge, stirabout
  2. paste

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

leite

  1. Alternative form of leyt

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse leita.

VerbEdit

leite (imperative leit, present tense leiter, simple past lette or leita or leitet or leitte, past participle lett or leita or leitet or leitt)

  1. to look (etter (for))
  2. to search (etter (for))

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

leite (present tense leitar or leiter, past tense leita or leitte, past participle leita or leitt, present participle leitande, imperative leit)

  1. Alternative form of leita

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese leite, from Vulgar Latin lactem (“milk”, masculine or feminine accusative), from Latin lac (“milk”, neuter), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵlákts. Romance cognates include Catalan llet, French lait, Galician leite, Italian latte, Romanian lapte, Spanish leche.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

leite m (plural leites)

  1. milk
    Eu gosto de café com leite e açúcar.
    I like coffee with milk and sugar.
  2. (slang) semen, cum, jizz
    Eu gosto muito do sabor salgado do seu leite quente.
    I love the salty taste of his hot cum.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit