See also: Semen, sémen, semèn, and sêmen

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English semen, from Latin sēmen (seed), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow; plant).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

semen (usually uncountable, plural semens)

  1. A sticky, milky fluid produced in male reproductive organs that contains the reproductive cells.
    • 1962 [1959], William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch, New York: Grove Press, page 80:
      Sharp protein odor of semen fills the air.
    • 1981, William Irwin Thompson, The Time Falling Bodies Take to Light: Mythology, Sexuality and the Origins of Culture, London: Rider/Hutchinson & Co., page 162:
      In the Sumerian language the word for water also means semen, and since Enki is the god of water, he is therefore the god of semen. In this ode to the Great Father, the land of the Sumerians is literally awash with semen.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

semen

  1. third-person plural present indicative of semar
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of semar

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin sēmen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

semen m (plural sèmens or sémens)

  1. semen, sperm
    Synonym: esperma

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

semen

  1. genitive plural of semeno

IndonesianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Malay semen, from Dutch cement (cement), from Old French ciment, from Latin caementum (quarry stone; stone chips for making mortar), from caedō (I cut, hew). Cognate with Afrikaans sement (cement). The sense cementum is a semantic loan from English cement.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sêmèn (first-person possessive semenku, second-person possessive semenmu, third-person possessive semennya)

  1. cement (powdered substance)
  2. cement, the layer of bone investing the root and neck of a tooth; cementum.
Alternative formsEdit
  • simen (Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Learned borrowing from Latin sēmen (semen, seed), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow; plant).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sèmèn (first-person possessive semenku, second-person possessive semenmu, third-person possessive semennya)

  1. (medicine) semen, the fluid, produced in male reproductive organs of an animal, that contains the reproductive cells.
    Synonym: air mani
Alternative formsEdit
Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *sēmen, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₁mn̥ (seed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sēmen n (genitive sēminis); third declension

  1. seed (of plants)
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 5.221-222:
      ‘prīma per immēnsās sparsī nova sēmina gentēs!
      ūnīus tellūs ante colōris erat.’
      “First [it was] I [who] scattered new seeds throughout countless nations!
      Previously the earth was of [but] one color.”

      (The poetic voice is that of Flora (mythology).)
    Semen manu spargere.To scatter seed by hand.
  2. semen
  3. graft
  4. offspring
  5. cause
  6. (poetic) seed (of the elements of other bodies (of fire, water, stones, etc.))

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sēmen sēmina
Genitive sēminis sēminum
Dative sēminī sēminibus
Accusative sēmen sēmina
Ablative sēmine sēminibus
Vocative sēmen sēmina

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • semen”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • semen”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • semen in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the elements and first beginnings: elementa et tamquam semina rerum
    • to sow: serere; semen spargere

MalteseEdit

Root
s-m-n
10 terms

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic سَمْن(samn).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

semen m

  1. butter
    Synonym: butir

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chemin.

NounEdit

semen

  1. road, street

ReferencesEdit

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Old English sēman, from Proto-West Germanic *sōmijan, from Proto-Germanic *sōmijaną.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

semen (third-person singular simple present semeth, present participle semende, semynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle semed)

  1. (Early Middle English) To sort out; to resolve, subdue, or confirm.
ConjugationEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse sœma, from Proto-Germanic *sōmijaną, thus a doublet of Etymology 1.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

semen (third-person singular simple present semeth, present participle semende, semynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle semed)

  1. To seem (to be); to look or be perceived as.
    • 14th Century, Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, The Knight's Tale
      The brighte swerdes wenten to and fro
      So hidously þat with þe leste strook
      That it semeþ þat it wolde felle an ook
  2. To appear; to become visible or discernible.
  3. To believe or assume; to develop a belief:
    1. To deem or consider; to form a judgement.
    2. To consider to be appropriate; to judge as suitable.
  4. To be appropriate or right; to suit or befit.
  5. (rare) To exist; to be extant.
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Inherited from Old English sīman, sēman, from Proto-West Germanic *saumijan; equivalent to seem (load) +‎ -en (infinitival suffix).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseːmən/, /ˈsɛːmən/

VerbEdit

semen (third-person singular simple present semeth, present participle semende, semynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle semed)

  1. To load up or with; to place upon.
  2. (figuratively, rare) To be burdensome or grievous.
ConjugationEdit
ReferencesEdit

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from semăna.

NounEdit

semen m (plural semeni)

  1. fellow human

DeclensionEdit


Seychellois CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French chemin.

NounEdit

semen

  1. road, street

ReferencesEdit

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol - Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois - Français

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sēmen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsemen/ [ˈse.mẽn]
  • Rhymes: -emen
  • Hyphenation: se‧men

NounEdit

semen m (uncountable)

  1. semen, sperm
    Mi amigo me preguntó si era saludable tragarse su propio semen.
    My friend asked me if it was healthy to swallow his own semen.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *seemen, from a Baltic language, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₁mn̥.

NounEdit

semen

  1. seed

InflectionEdit

Inflection of semen (inflection type 22/homen)
nominative sing. semen
genitive sing. semnen
partitive sing. sement
partitive plur. semnid
singular plural
nominative semen semned
accusative semnen semned
genitive semnen semniden
partitive sement semnid
essive-instructive semnen semnin
translative semneks semnikš
inessive semnes semniš
elative semnespäi semnišpäi
illative semnehe semnihe
adessive semnel semnil
ablative semnelpäi semnilpäi
allative semnele semnile
abessive semneta semnita
comitative semnenke semnidenke
prolative sementme semnidme
approximative I semnenno semnidenno
approximative II semnennoks semnidennoks
egressive semnennopäi semnidennopäi
terminative I semnehesai semnihesai
terminative II semnelesai semnilesai
terminative III semnessai
additive I semnehepäi semnihepäi
additive II semnelepäi semnilepäi

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “семя”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika