porridge

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Variant of pottage (thick soup or stew), influenced by porray (stew of leeks). The "prison sentence" sense comes from the British tradition of serving prisoners porridge for breakfast.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

porridge (usually uncountable, plural porridges)

  1. A dish made of grain or legumes, milk and/or water, heated and stirred until thick and typically eaten for breakfast.
    Eat your porridge while it's hot!
    • 1922, Michael Arlen, “1/1/2”, in “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days[1]:
      There were rumours, new rumours every morning, delightful and outrageous rumours, so that the lumps in the porridge were swallowed without comment and the fish-cakes were eaten without contumely.
  2. (chiefly Britain) Oatmeal porridge.
  3. (Britain, slang) A prison sentence.
    Just do your porridge and keep your head down.
  4. (rare) A type of thick soup or stew, especially thickened with barley.

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