See also: liège, Liege, and Liège

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English liege, lege, lige, from Anglo-Norman lige, from Old French liege (liege, free), from Middle High German ledic, ledec (free, empty, vacant) (Modern German ledig (unmarried)) from Proto-Germanic *liþugaz (flexible, free, unoccupied).

Akin to Old Frisian leþeg, leþoch (free), Old English liþiġ (flexible), Old Norse liðugr (free, unhindered), Old Saxon lethig (idle), Low German leddig (empty), Middle Dutch ledich (idle, unemployed) (Dutch ledig (empty) and leeg (empty)), Middle English lethi (unoccupied, at leisure).

An alternate etymology traces the Old French word to Late Latin laeticus (of or relating to a semifree colonist in Gaul), from Latin laetus (a semi-free colonist), from Gothic *𐌻𐌴𐍄𐍃 (*lēts) (attested in derivatives such as 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐌻𐌴𐍄𐍃 (fralēts)), from Proto-Germanic *lētaz (freeman; bondsman, serf), from *lētaną (to let; free; release).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

liege (plural lieges)

  1. A free and independent person; specifically, a lord paramount; a sovereign.
  2. (in full liege lord) A king or lord.
  3. The subject of a sovereign or lord; a liegeman.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

liege (not comparable)

  1. Sovereign; independent; having authority or right to allegiance.
    a liege lord
  2. Serving an independent sovereign or master; bound by a feudal tenure; obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, such as a vassal to his lord; faithful.
    a liege man; a liege subject
  3. (obsolete, law) Full; perfect; complete; pure.
    • 1908, Daniel Scott (of Penrith), Stricklands of Sizergh Castle:
      it was a release by Katherine de Ros in her liege widowhood to Sir Thomas de Stirkeland

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

liege

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of liegen

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

liege

  1. inflection of liegen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin leuca, leuga.

NounEdit

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (league)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman lige.

NounEdit

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (liege)

AdjectiveEdit

liege

  1. Alternative form of lege (adjective)

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German liegen, from Old High German liogan, from Proto-West Germanic *leugan. Compare German lügen, Dutch liegen, English lie.

VerbEdit

liege

  1. to tell a lie