See also: luxé, lûxe, lüxe, and łuxe

English edit

Etymology edit

From French luxe, from Latin luxus. Cognate with English lock.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luxe (uncountable)

  1. Luxury.
    • 2009 May 31, Vicky Frost, “'Bits of it are insanely glamorous'”, in The Guardian[1], London: Guardian News & Media, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2019-04-14:
      When it comes to advertising, he says, the much talked-about idea that luxe is recession-proof has been proven not to be the case.
    • 2014 August 18, Booth Moore, “Mansur Gavriel finds success with stealth luxe”, in Los Angeles Times[2], Los Angeles, L.A.: Los Angeles Times Communications LLC, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-10-04:
      With sleek bucket bags, totes and backpacks priced from $460 to $950, Mansur Gavriel is targeting women who want low-key luxe and value without overt logos or labeling.
    • 2016 October 12, Sean Sullivan, “Trump's Scottish golf resorts report 2015 losses”, in The Washington Post[3], Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-03-21:
      A pair of luxe Scottish golf resorts operated by Donald Trump suffered millions of dollars in losses during 2015, according to recent filings with a U.K. government agency, adding another complication to Trump's pitch for the White House, in which he has frequently emphasized his business acumen.
    • 2019 February 14, Amanda Mull, “Legal Weed Gets a Luxury Makeover”, in The Atlantic[4], Washington, D.C.: The Atlantic Monthly Group, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-10-06:
      The luxe department store Barneys New York announced this week that it would launch a new Instagram-ready cannabis department called The High End.

Adjective edit

luxe (comparative luxier, superlative luxest or luxiest)

  1. Luxurious, sophisticated.
    • 2017 December 7, “Simple and inexpensive DIY manicures for luxe holiday nails”, in CBC News[5], archived from the original on 2018-05-12:
      Lots of shows at fashion week utilize dry brushing nail techniques on the models because it gives a super luxe finish with minimal effort.
    • 2018 July 18, Steven Kurutz, “This Design Studio Knows How to Party”, in The New York Times[6], New York, N.Y.: The New York Times Company, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-11-25:
      "The quality and the tailoring is what makes it so luxe," Mr. [Michael] Reynolds said. "Like a piece you'd see created by Hermès, it's not over the top."
    • 2019 September 18, Steff Yotka, “The Elder Statesman Spring 2020 Ready-to-Wear Collection”, in Vogue[7], New York, N.Y.: Condé Nast Publications, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-08-18:
      As a designer and brand builder, [Greg] Chait has turned The Elder Statesman into the coolest of cool and the luxe-est of luxe; the proof is in the many copycats of his tie-dye knitwear and slouchy casual spirit.
    • 2020, Emily Segal, Mercury Retrograde, New York: Deluge Books, →ISBN:
      I found it extremely luxe that there was a stack of large-format Moleskines you could take at your whim from the cabinet behind the receptionist.
    • 2022 November 28, Anna Tingley, “Parachute's Entire Website Is 20% Off for Cyber Monday”, in Variety[8], Los Angeles, C.A.: Penske Media Corporation, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2022-12-03:
      Wrap yourself in this ultra-soft and lightweight waffle robe, inspired by some of the most luxe spas.

Derived terms edit

References edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin lūxus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luxe m (plural luxes)

  1. luxury

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French luxe, from Latin luxus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

luxe m (plural luxes, diminutive luxetje n)

  1. luxury
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

The first part of typical compounds with luxe (e.g. luxe-editie (luxury edition), luxevilla (luxury-mansion), ...) is reinterpreted as an adjective, instead of a noun.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

luxe (comparative luxer, superlative meest luxe or luxest)

  1. (Netherlands) luxurious
  2. (Netherlands) deluxe
Inflection edit
Declension of luxe
uninflected luxe
inflected luxe
comparative luxer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial luxe luxer het luxest
het luxeste
indefinite m./f. sing. luxe luxere luxeste
n. sing. luxe luxer luxeste
plural luxe luxere luxeste
definite luxe luxere luxeste
partitive luxes luxers
Synonyms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin lūxus.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /lyks/
  • (file)

Noun edit

luxe m (plural luxes)

  1. luxury

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: luxe
  • English: luxe
  • Persian: لوکس (luks)
  • Swedish: lyx
  • Turkish: lüks

Verb edit

luxe

  1. inflection of luxer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

lū̆xe

  1. vocative masculine singular of lū̆xus

Ligurian edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin lūcem, accusative singular of lūx, from Proto-Italic *louks (accusative *loukem), from the Proto-Indo-European *léwks, derived from the root *lewk- (white; light; bright). Cognates include Italian luce and Spanish luz.

Noun edit

luxe f (plural luxi)

  1. light, particularly:
    1. (physics, uncountable) Visible electromagnetic radiation.
    2. A source of illumination.
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

luxe

  1. inflection of luxî:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

Spanish edit

Verb edit

luxe

  1. inflection of luxar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative