mantener

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manūteneō, manūtenēre (I support), from Latin manū (with the hand) + teneō (I hold).

VerbEdit

mantener

  1. to maintain; to keep

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manūteneō, manūtenēre (I support), from Latin manū (with the hand) + teneō (I hold).

VerbEdit

mantener (Latin spelling)

  1. to maintain, preserve

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin manūteneō, manūtenēre (I support), from Latin manū (with the hand) + teneō (to hold). Equivalent to mano + tener. Compare Portuguese manter, French maintenir, Italian mantenere.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /manteˈneɾ/, [mãn̪.t̪eˈneɾ]

VerbEdit

mantener (first-person singular present mantengo, first-person singular preterite mantuve, past participle mantenido)

  1. (transitive) to keep
    Mantenga la tapa cerrada, por favor.Keep the lid closed, please.
  2. (transitive) to maintain, to support
    Yo mantengo a mis hijos.I support my children.
  3. (transitive) to sustain, to preserve, to retain, to uphold
  4. (transitive) to maintain, continue, to keep up
    Mantengan el buen trabajo.Keep up the good work.
  5. (transitive) to stay, to remain
  6. (reflexive) to maintain, to keep, to stay, to remain
    Me voy a mantener despierto toda la noche estudiando la gramática española.
    I'm going to keep myself awake all night studying Spanish grammar.
    (A more natural way of expressing this in many English dialects would be "I'm going to stay awake.")
  7. (reflexive) to stand, to hold, to remain, to continue (e.g. hold firm, stand strong, stand together, stand on one's feet)
    Debemos mantenernos firmes exigiendo libertad.We must stand firm in demanding freedom.
  8. (reflexive) to stick to (e.g. stick to one's guns)
  9. (reflexive) to be maintained, to be retained, to be sustained

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit