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See also: téner

Contents

AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō.

VerbEdit

tener

  1. to have, hold

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tenēre, present active infinitive of teneō.

VerbEdit

tener

  1. have got, to have
  2. to have to (indicates necessity)

ConjugationEdit


InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

tener

  1. to hold

ConjugationEdit


InterlingueEdit

VerbEdit

tener

  1. to hold

ConjugationEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

tener

  1. Apocopic form of tenere

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw). Cognates include Ancient Greek τείνω (teínō), Sanskrit तनोति (tanóti) and Old English þennan.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tener (feminine tenera, neuter tenerum); first/second declension

  1. soft, delicate, tender
  2. young, youthful
  3. effeminate, sensitive
  4. (poetic) erotic

InflectionEdit

First/second declension, nominative masculine singular in -er.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative tener tenera tenerum tenerī tenerae tenera
genitive tenerī tenerae tenerī tenerōrum tenerārum tenerōrum
dative tenerō tenerō tenerīs
accusative tenerum teneram tenerum tenerōs tenerās tenera
ablative tenerō tenerā tenerō tenerīs
vocative tener tenera tenerum tenerī tenerae tenera

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tener in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tener in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tener” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be confined to one's bed: lecto teneri
    • (ambiguous) to be in gross error, seriously misled: magno errore teneri
    • (ambiguous) to be enamoured of philosophy: philosophiae (sapientiae) studio teneri (Acad. 1. 2. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to cherish a hope: spe duci, niti, teneri
    • (ambiguous) to long for a thing, yearn for it: desiderio alicuius rei teneri, affici (more strongly flagrare, incensum esse)
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by one's word; to be on one's honour: fide obstrictum teneri (Pis. 13. 29)
    • (ambiguous) to have an inclination for a thing: studio alicuius rei teneri
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by oath: iureiurando teneri (Off. 3. 27. 100)
    • (ambiguous) to be the slave of superstition: superstitione teneri, constrictum esse, obligatum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be bound by a law: lege teneri
    • (ambiguous) to be convicted by some one's evidence: testibus teneri, convictum esse

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tener, tenerum.

AdjectiveEdit

tener m (feminine singular tenra, masculine plural teners, feminine plural tenras)

  1. tender

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin teneō, tenēre.

VerbEdit

tener

  1. (Sursilvan) to hold, keep
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tenēre (to hold, to have), present active infinitive of teneō (I hold, I have), from Proto-Italic *tenēō, stative from Proto-Indo-European *ten- (to stretch, draw).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tener (first-person singular present tengo, first-person singular preterite tuve, past participle tenido)

  1. (transitive) to have, possess
    Ella tiene seis hermanos.She has six brothers.
    Tengo una pluma.I have a pen.
  2. (transitive) to possess (a condition or quality)
    Usted tiene suerte.You are lucky.
    (literally: “You have luck.”)
    ¡Ten cuidado!Be careful!
    (literally: “Have care!”)
    ¿Quién tiene razón?Who is right?
    (literally: “Who has reason?”)
  3. (transitive) to hold, grasp
    Ten esto.Hold this.
  4. (transitive) to contain
    Este tarro tiene las cenizas.This jar contains the ashes.
  5. (transitive) to have, feel (internally)
    Él le tiene mucho cariño a ella.He has much admiration for her.
    Tengo frío.I feel cold.
    Tenemos hambre.We are hungry.
    (literally: “We have hunger.”)
  6. (transitive) to make to feel
    Eso nos tiene tristes.That makes us sad.
  7. (transitive) to have (a measure or age)
    Tiene tres metros de ancho.It is three metres wide.
    (literally: “It has three metres of width.”)
    Tengo veinte años.I am twenty years (old).
    (literally: “I have twenty years.”)
  8. (used with que) To have to
    Tengo que salir ahora. - "I have to leave now."


Usage NotesEdit

  • (to feel): Tener is often used with nouns like calor (heat), frío (coldness), hambre (hunger), sed (thirst), to indicate states; English would use adjectives instead:

-Tengo hambre. EN: I'm hungry. (lit "I have hunger")

-Tengo miedo. EN: I'm scared. (lit "I have fear")

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit