See also: Milord

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French milord, from English my Lord. Compare milady.

NounEdit

milord (plural milords)

  1. (Britain, obsolete, humorous) An English nobleman, especially one traveling Europe in grand style; a wealthy British gentleman.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, 49
      Not since the year 17—, when milord Castlebrilliant's curricle was whirled to sea with her ladyship within, had there been such vehement weather.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A variant spelling of m'lord, elided from my +‎ lord.

NounEdit

milord (plural milords)

  1. Alternative form of m'lord

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

milord (third-person singular simple present milords, present participle milording, simple past and past participle milorded)

  1. To address as “milord”.
    • 1834 May 1, “The Reefer’s First Cruise”, in H[enry] W[illiam] Herbert, editor, The American Monthly Magazine, volume III, number III, New York, N.Y.: [] Monson Bancroft, [] G. & C. & H. Carvill, [] and Peter Hill, [], page 189:
      A few pauls a-piece, however, did the business, and after a few more tunes, and some more milordi and capitani, the musicians, finding no more prospect of pauls, departed, leaving the landlord to do the rest of the milording and captaining to the honored Americani.
    • 1854, Crotchet Crayon [pseudonym], “How Mrs. Dobbs arrived in Paris, and made a new acquaintance. []”, in The Rival Houses of the Hobbs and Dobbs: or, Dress-Makers & Dress-Wearers, London: G. Routledge & Co., [], page 50:
      Poor, humble, unaspiring Mr. Dobbs was “Milorded,” to his great annoyance, by everybody, at the Parisian hotel; and monsieur the landlord thought it but right that the rich English “Milord” should pay for the superior accommodation himself and family received at “Le Grand Hôtel.”
    • 1885, Antonio [Carlo Napoleone] Gallenga, “First Repentance. []”, in Episodes of My Second Life. (American and English Experiences.), Philadelphia, Pa.: J. B. Lippincott & Co., page 275:
      To the ignorant Italians who milorded or miladied them, they were always anxious to explain that they “had no titles, and would be sorry to have any,”—that the members of the House of Lords were for the most part mere upstarts, and that the true nobility of England were the old land-owners,—the county families,—before whose names men only placed the plain Mr. and Mrs. by which they themselves, the Crawleys, preferred to be designated.
    • 1998, Laurel Schunk, Death in Exile, Wichita, Kan.: St Kitts Press, →ISBN, LCCN 98-86628, pages 11–12:
      [] I must fetch the doctor for her, milord.” Quill’s eyebrows rose. “You’re hiding her? And no ‘milording’ me. I’m the same old Quill.”

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English my Lord. See also milady.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

milord m (plural milords)

  1. (archaic) Milord, an English lord abroad.
    • 1959, Edith Piaf singing Georges Moustaki's "Milord"
      Laissez-vous faire, Milord,
      Venez dans mon royaume:
      Je soigne les remords,
      Je chante la romance,
      Je chante les milords
      Qui n'ont pas eu de chance!
      Let yourself go, Milord.
      Come into my kingdom:
      I treat your remorse,
      I sing of romance,
      I sing of milords
      who've never had a chance!
  2. (figuratively, informal, dated) A rich man.
  3. A horse-drawn car with a raised seat for the driver.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English milord.

NounEdit

milord m (invariable)

  1. lord, milord
  2. dandy (elegant man)

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English milord.

NounEdit

milord m (plural milords)

  1. (Jersey) swell

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English milord.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /miˈloɾ/, [miˈloɾ]

NounEdit

milord m (plural milores)

  1. milord

Further readingEdit