See also: Grand, grànd, gränd, grãnd, grand-, and grand'

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɹænd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English grand, grond, graund, graunt, from Anglo-Norman graunt, from Old French grant, from Latin grandis. Doublet of grande and grandee.

Alternative forms edit

Adjective edit

grand (comparative grander or more grand, superlative grandest or most grand)

  1. (augmentative) Large, senior (high-ranking), intense, extreme, or exceptional
    1. Of a large size or extent; great.
      a grand mountain
      a grand army
      a grand mistake
    2. Great in size, and fine or imposing in appearance or impression; illustrious, dignified, magnificent.
      a grand monarch
      a grand view
      His simple vision has transformed into something far more grand.
      • 1863, Sheridan Le Fanu, The House by the Churchyard:
        In the mean time, Cluffe had arrived. He was a little bit huffed and grand at being nailed as an evidence, upon a few words carelessly, or, if you will, confidentially dropped at his own mess-table, where Lowe chanced to be a guest; and certainly with no suspicion that his little story could in any way be made to elucidate the mystery of Sturk's murder.
    3. Having higher rank or more dignity, size, or importance than other persons or things of the same name.
      a grand lodge
      a grand vizier
      a grand piano
      The Grand Viziers of the Ottoman Empire.
      Grand Admiral
  2. (usually in compound forms) Standing in the second or some more remote degree of parentage or descent (see grand-).
    grandfather, grandson, grand-child
  3. (Ireland, Northern England, colloquial, otherwise dated) Fine; lovely.
    A cup of tea? That'd be grand.
  4. (music) Containing all the parts proper to a given form of composition.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

grand (plural grands or grand)

  1. (plural "grand") A thousand of some unit of currency, such as dollars or pounds. (Compare G.)
  2. (music, plural "grands") A grand piano
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From granddaughter, grandfather, grandmother, grandson, etc.

Noun edit

grand (plural grands)

  1. A grandparent or grandchild.
    • 1987, Toni Morrison, Beloved, page 269:
      Once, in Maryland, he met four families of slaves who had all been together for a hundred years: great-grands, grands, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, cousins, children.
    • 2012, Brenda Jackson, Texas Wild & Beyond Temptation, page 47:
      Her granddaughter and great-granddaughter went with us as chaperones. Did I ever tell you that she had six grands and two great-grands? [] And Emily agrees with me it's a shame that I don't even have a grand.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Bourguignon edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis.

Adjective edit

grand (feminine grand or grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grands or grandes)

  1. big

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French grand, from Old French grant, from Latin grandem.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡʁɑ̃/, (followed by vowel or h muet) /ɡʁɑ̃.t‿/
  • (file)

Adjective edit

grand (feminine grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes)

  1. big
  2. tall
  3. grown up, big
    Quand je serai grande, je veux être astronaute.When I grow up, I want to be an astronaut.
    Il l’a fait tout seul comme un grand garçon.He did it all on his own like a big boy.
  4. great
    un grand hommea great man
    une grande damea great lady
    un grand écrivaina great writer
    un grand compositeura great composer
    Alexandre le GrandAlexander the Great
    Pierre le GrandPeter the Great
  5. big fat (an intensifier)
    Synonym: gros
    un grand tricheura big fat cheater

Usage notes edit

This adjective is usually placed before the noun. When applied to people, the meaning "great" is only available when the adjective is before the noun. When it is placed after the noun, it can only mean physically large or (more commonly) tall. Un grand homme can be a great man or a large/tall man; un homme grand can only be a large/tall man.

Noun edit

grand m (plural grands, feminine grande)

  1. grown-up

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Friulian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • grant (standard orthography)

Adjective edit

grand

  1. Alternative form of grant

Icelandic edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse grand (injury, hurt).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

grand n (genitive singular grands, nominative plural grönd)

  1. (higher register, uncommon) damage, harm, destruction
    verða að grandicome to harm
  2. (card games) absence of trump cards/suits; no-trump
Declension edit
Synonyms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From English grand (magnificent).

Adjective edit

grand

  1. (colloquial) grandiose, splashy, impressive
    Synonyms: tilkomumikill, flottur
    Veislan var svaka grand.The party was very grandiose.

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

Akin to Italian grande, from Latin grandis.

Adjective edit

grand

  1. big, large

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective edit

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes) (comparative greigneur, superlative greigneur)

  1. big; large

Descendants edit

  • French: grand
  • Norman: grand
  • Picard: grand
  • English: grand

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɡrɑ̃/, /ɡrɔ̃/
  • (file)
    (Jersey)

Adjective edit

grand m

  1. (Jersey) big

Derived terms edit

Occitan edit

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis.

Adjective edit

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. big, large
    Antonyms: pichon, petit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians[1], 2 edition, →ISBN, page 538.

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Spanish grande.

Noun edit

grand m pers

  1. grandee (high-ranking Spanish nobleman)
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

grand

  1. genitive plural of granda

Further reading edit

  • grand in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • grond (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Vallader)
  • grànd (Sutsilvan)

Etymology edit

From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective edit

grand m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandas)

  1. (Puter) big, large
  2. (Puter) tall

Swedish edit

Noun edit

grand n

  1. a mote, a speck, something very small and unimportant
    Huru kommer det till, att du ser grandet i din broders öga, men icke bliver varse bjälken i ditt eget öga?
    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? (Matthew 7:3)

Usage notes edit

  • The form grann is used in the adverb litegrann (a bit), which in older texts can be written litet grand.
  • Phrases like vi åt lunch på Grand, refer to a "Grand Hotel" available in several towns

Declension edit

Declension of grand 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative grand grandet grand granden
Genitive grands grandets grands grandens

Walloon edit

Etymology edit

From Old French grant, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

grand m (feminine singular grande, masculine plural grands, feminine plural grandes, feminine plural (before noun) grandès)

  1. large, big