missing

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɪsɪŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪsɪŋ

VerbEdit

missing

  1. present participle of miss

AdjectiveEdit

missing (not comparable)

  1. Not able to be located; gone, misplaced.
    Synonyms: absent, lost
    my missing socks
    • 1808 October 1, “State of Public Affairs in September. Containing Official Papers and Authentic Documents. [Killed and Wounded on Board the Emperor of Russia’s Late Ship of War Sevolod.]”, in The Monthly Magazine, or British Register, volume XXVI, part II, number 3 (number 176 overall), London: Printed for Richard Phillips, []; printed by J. Adlard, [], OCLC 1013453163, page 281, column 1:
      Forty three killed and 80 wounded in action with the Implacable. 180 killed and miſſing in action with the Centaur.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter 6, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, OL 5535161W:
      She was so mad she wouldn't speak to me for quite a spell, but at last I coaxed her into going up to Miss Emmeline's room and fetching down a tintype of the missing Deacon man.
  2. Not present when it (they) should be.
    missing data point
    Joe went missing last year.
  3. Of an internal combustion engine: running roughly due to an occasional lack of a spark or other irregular fault.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

missing (plural missings)

  1. (statistics) A value that is missing.
    • 1997, S. Klinke, Data Structures for Computational Statistics (page 27)
      The treatment of missings is a problem in statistical software.
    • 2002, David J. Hand, ‎Niall M. Adams, ‎Richard J. Bolton, Pattern Detection and Discovery
      Patterns of missings across the whole data set are readily visible, but also patterns which only apply to small subgroups of cases.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit