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See also: Miss, miß, Miß, miss-, miß-, and Miss.

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɪs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English missen, from Old English missan (to miss, escape the notice of a person), Proto-Germanic *missijaną (to miss, go wrong, fail), from Proto-Indo-European *meyt- (to change, exchange, trade). Cognate with West Frisian misse (to miss), Dutch missen (to miss), German vermissen (to do without, miss), Norwegian Bokmål and Danish miste (to lose), Swedish missa (to miss), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic missa (to lose).

VerbEdit

miss (third-person singular simple present misses, present participle missing, simple past and past participle missed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To fail to hit.
    I missed the target.
    I tried to kick the ball, but missed.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Francis Bacon
      Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Waller
      Flying bullets now, / To execute his rage, appear too slow; / They miss, or sweep but common souls away.
  2. (transitive) To fail to achieve or attain.
    to miss an opportunity
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Locke
      When a man misses his great end, happiness, he will acknowledge he judged not right.
  3. (transitive) To feel the absence of someone or something, sometimes with regret.
    I miss you! Come home soon!
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], chapter I, in The Squire’s Daughter, London: Methuen, OCLC 12026604; republished New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, 1919, OCLC 491297620:
      The boy became volubly friendly and bubbling over with unexpected humour and high spirits. He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. Nobody would miss them, he explained.
  4. (transitive) To fail to understand or have a shortcoming of perception.
    miss the joke
  5. (transitive) To fail to attend.
    Joe missed the meeting this morning.
  6. (transitive) To be late for something (a means of transportation, a deadline, etc.).
    I missed the plane!
  7. (only in present tense) To be wanting; to lack something that should be present.
    The car is missing essential features.
  8. (poker, said of a card) To fail to help the hand of a player.
    Player A: J7. Player B: Q6. Table: 283. The flop missed both players!
  9. (sports) To fail to score (a goal).
    • 2011 September 18, Ben Dirs, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 41-10 Georgia”, in BBC Sport:
      Georgia, ranked 16th in the world, dominated the breakdown before half-time and forced England into a host of infringements, but fly-half Merab Kvirikashvili missed three penalties.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To go wrong; to err.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser
      Amongst the angels, a whole legion / Of wicked sprites did fall from happy bliss; / What wonder then if one, of women all, did miss?
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To be absent, deficient, or wanting.
Usage notesEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

miss (plural misses)

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A failure to obtain or accomplish.
  3. An act of avoidance (used with the verb give).
    I think I’ll give the meeting a miss.
  4. (computing) The situation where an item is not found in a cache and therefore needs to be explicitly loaded.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From mistress.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

miss (countable and uncountable, plural misses)

  1. A title of respect for a young woman (usually unmarried) with or without a name used.
    You may sit here, miss.
    You may sit here, Miss Jones.
  2. An unmarried woman; a girl.
    • 1771, James Cawthorn, Poems, by the Rev. Mr. Cawthorn, Late Master of Tunbridge School[1]:
      While thus the fiends, with wily art, Adroitly stole upon the heart, And with their complaisance, and tales, Had ruind more than half the males, Gay Vanity, with smiles, and kisses, Was busy 'mongst the maids, and misses.
  3. A kept woman; a mistress.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)
  4. (card games) In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English miss.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English miss.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

miss f (plural missen, diminutive missje n)

  1. A winner of a beauty contest.
    Annelien Coorevits was Miss België in 2007.
    Annelien Coorevits was Miss Belgium in 2007.
  2. A beauty.
  3. A girl with a high self-esteem.
    Dat is nogal een miss, hoor.
    She has some air.

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

miss

  1. second-person singular imperative of messen

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

miss

  1. imperative of missa

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *missą, *missijaz, *missō (loss, want), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- (to change, replace). Cognate with Old Norse missir, missa (a loss).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

miss n

  1. loss; absence

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English miss.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

miss c

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A mistake.
  3. (rare) A beauty; a winner of a beauty contest.
    Miss Hawaii gick vidare och vann Miss America-tävlingen
    Miss Hawaii went on to win the Miss America contest

DeclensionEdit

Declension of miss 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative miss missen missar missarna
Genitive miss missens missars missarnas

SynonymsEdit