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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin locātus, past participle of loco (to place), from locus (place)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

locate (third-person singular simple present locates, present participle locating, simple past and past participle located)

  1. (transitive) To place; to set in a particular spot or position.
    • B. F. Westcott
      The captives and emigrants whom he brought with him were located in the trans-Tiberine quarter.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68:
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies.
  2. (transitive) To find out where something is located.
  3. (transitive) To designate the site or place of; to define the limits of (Note: the designation may be purely descriptive: it need not be prescriptive.)
    The council must locate the new hospital
    to locate a mining claim
    to locate (the land granted by) a land warrant
    • Herbert Spencer
      That part of the body in which the sense of touch is located.
  4. (intransitive, colloquial) To place oneself; to take up one's residence; to settle.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

locāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of locātus