EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English molesten, from Old French molester, from Latin molestō (to trouble, annoy, molest), from molestus (troublesome), from moles (a burden, difficulty, labor, trouble); see mole.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /məˈlɛst/
    • (file)

VerbEdit

molest (third-person singular simple present molests, present participle molesting, simple past and past participle molested)

  1. To annoy intentionally.
  2. To disturb or tamper with.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      They have molested the church with needless opposition.
    • 2020, Chief Executive in Council, “Prevention and Control of Disease (Prohibition on Group Gathering) Regulation”, in Government of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Gazette[1], page B555:
      A person must not delay, obstruct, hinder or molest an authorized officer who is performing a function under this Regulation.
  3. To sexually assault or sexually harass (a minor).

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from Dutch molest.

NounEdit

molest

  1. (law) damage from war.

Further readingEdit