EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English morsel, from Old French morsel, from Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, perfect passive participle of mordeo (I bite). Compare French morceau.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morsel (plural morsels)

  1. A small fragment or share of something, commonly applied to food.
    • 1979, Roald Dahl, The Twits
      By sticking out his tongue and curling it sideways to explore the hairy jungle around his mouth, he was always able to find a tasty morsel here and there to nibble on.
  2. A mouthful of food.
  3. A very small amount.
    • 2008, Pamela Griffin, New York Brides, Barbour Publishing Inc. (2008), →ISBN, page 70:
      Didn't even a morsel of decency remain in his brother?

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Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French morsel, morsiel, morcel.

NounEdit

morsel (plural morsels)

  1. small piece of food

DescendantsEdit

  • English: morsel
  • Yola: mossaale

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, past participle of mordeō, mordēre (bite, nibble, gnaw), from Proto-Indo-European *merə- (to rub, wipe; to pack, rob).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morsel m (oblique plural morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative singular morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative plural morsel)

  1. morsel; bit; piece

DescendantsEdit