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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English morsel, from Old French morsel, from Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive. of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, past participle of mordere (to bite). Compare French morceau.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morsel (plural morsels)

  1. A small fragment or share of something, commonly applied to food.
  2. A mouthful of food.
  3. A very small amount.
    • 2008, Pamela Griffin, New York Brides, Barbour Publishing Inc. (2008), →ISBN, page 70:
      Didn't even a morsel of decency remain in his brother?

SynonymsEdit

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Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin morsellum (a bit, a little piece), diminutive of Latin morsum (a bit), neuter of morsus, past participle of mordeō, mordēre (bite, nibble, gnaw), from Proto-Indo-European *merə- (to rub, wipe; to pack, rob).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

morsel m (oblique plural morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative singular morseaus or morseax or morsiaus or morsiax or morsels, nominative plural morsel)

  1. morsel; bit; piece

DescendantsEdit

  • English: morsel
  • French: morceau
  • Norman: morcé (Jersey, Guernsey)