See also: Muir

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*móri

From Old Irish muir, from Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

muir f (genitive singular mara, nominative plural mara)

  1. sea
    Ní fhanann muir le fear sotail. (proverb)
    Time and tide wait for no man.
    (literally, “The sea doesn’t wait for an arrogant man.”)
    Synonym: farraige
  2. (astronomy) mare

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
muir mhuir not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


ManxEdit

NounEdit

muir f (genitive singular marrey, plural muiraghyn)

  1. Alternative form of mooir

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
muir vuir unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *mori.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

muir n (genitive moro or mora, nominative plural muire)

  1. sea
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 81a4
      inna fudumnai in moro
      the depths of the sea
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 126a4
      arna té .i. féith forsna muire
      so that it may not go, i.e. a calm over the seas
    • c. 808, Félire Oengusso, published in Félire Óengusso Céli Dé: The Martyrology of Oengus the Culdee (1905, Harrison & Sons), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes, June 21
      Ainle sochla slúagach, fris mbrúchta muir mílach,
      Ainle the famous and hostful, against whom the animal-filled sea bursts forth,

InflectionEdit

Neuter i-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative muirN muirN muireL
Vocative muirN muirN muireL
Accusative muirN muirN muireL
Genitive moroH, moraH moroH, moraH muireN
Dative muirL muirib muirib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Irish: muir

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
muir
also mmuir after a proclitic
muir
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*mori-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 277

Further readingEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English more, from Old English mōr, from Proto-Germanic *mōraz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [møːr], [myːr], [meːr], [miːr], [mjuːr]

NounEdit

muir (plural muirs)

  1. moor
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      This man, so gallant and braw, would never be for her; doubtless the fine suit and the capering horse were for Joan o' the Croft's pleasure. And he, in turn, when he remarked her wan cheeks and dowie eyes, had mind to what the dark man said on the muir, and saw in her a maid sworn to no mortal love.

Derived termsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*móri

From Old Irish muir, from Proto-Celtic *mori (compare Welsh môr), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (compare Latin mare, English mere, German Meer, Dutch meer).

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /murʲ/

NounEdit

muir m or f (genitive singular mara, plural marannan)

  1. sea, ocean
    Lean mi thar na mara thu.I followed thee over the sea.
    air muir 's air tìrby sea and by land
  2. wave
  3. pl large billows
  4. f worry, discomposure, mental suffering
    Nach ann air a tha a' mhuir an diugh!How troubled he is today!
    Tha muir ort an diugh, a Dhòmhnaill.You are in the dolours today, Donald.

Usage notesEdit

  • The nominative can be either masculine or feminine, the genitive is usually feminine.
  • muir and cuan are common words for sea and ocean respectively. fairge, on the other hand, is a poetic term that implies the rough sea.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
muir mhuir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward Dwelly (1911), “muir”, in Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan [The Illustrated Gaelic–English Dictionary], 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “muir”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language