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See also: Nov, nov., nov-, and Nov.

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening.

NounEdit

nov (plural novs)

  1. (slang, rare, rowing) A novice.
    • 1999, Oli Rosenbladt, "Virginia Women Sweep Rivanna Romp", in Rowing News (volume 6, number 21, page 8)
      The novice eights race demonstrated one of the reasons UVa manages to be so good year after year; the UVa novs finished first and second in the event, while Clemson's novice crew, the surprise of the regatta, took third.
    • 2015, Echo Freer, Toxic Treacle
      He scanned the group and his heart sank; he was shocked to see that, like Alex, they were mostly novices. [] He pulled down his scarf and drew Kraze to one side. 'Woz happenin' with the novs?'

CzechEdit

NounEdit

nov m

  1. new moon (phase of the moon)

AntonymsEdit


RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin novem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁néwn̥.

NumberEdit

nov

  1. (cardinal, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) nine
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Puter, Vallader) nouv

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin novus, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos

NumberEdit

nov m (feminine singular nova, masculine plural novs, feminine plural novas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) new
Alternative formsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *novъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nȍv (definite nȍvī, comparative noviji, Cyrillic spelling но̏в)

  1. new
  2. novel
  3. modern
  4. recent
  5. fresh

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *novъ, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nòv (comparative novêjši, superlative nàjnovêjši)

  1. new

DeclensionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


SwedishEdit

AbbreviationEdit

nov

  1. November; Abbreviation of november.

See alsoEdit