Last modified on 17 April 2015, at 11:32

mar

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English merren, from Old English mierran (to mar, disturb, confuse; scatter, squander, waste; upset, hinder, obstruct; err), from Proto-Germanic *marzijaną (to disturb, hinder), from Proto-Indo-European *mers- (to annoy, disturb, neglect, forget, ignore). Cognate with Scots mer, mar (to obstruct, impede, spoil, ruin), Dutch marren (to push along, delay, hinder), German dialectal merren (to entangle), Icelandic merja (to bruise, crush), Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍂𐌶𐌾𐌰𐌽 (marzjan, to annoy, bother, disturb, offend), Lithuanian miršti (to forget, lose, become oblivious, die), Armenian մոռանալ (moṙanal, to forget, fail).

VerbEdit

mar (third-person singular simple present mars, present participle marring, simple past and past participle marred)

  1. To spoil, to damage.
    • Dryden
      But mirth is marred, and the good cheer is lost.
    • Milton
      Ire, envy, and despair / Which marred all his borrowed visage.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See mere.

NounEdit

mar (plural mars)

  1. A small lake.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

AdverbEdit

mar

  1. (colloquial) alternative form of maar

ConjunctionEdit

mar

  1. (colloquial) alternative form of maar

AsturianEdit

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ast

NounEdit

mar m, f (plural mares)

  1. sea (body of water)

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare (sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

PronunciationEdit

  • (standard) IPA(key): /mar/, /maɾ/
  • Rhymes: -aɾ
  • (Balearic Islands) IPA(key): /ma/
  • Homophones: ma,
  • Rhymes: -a(ɾ)
  • Hyphenation: mar

NounEdit

mar m, f (plural mars)

  1. sea

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

NounEdit

mar m (plural mares)

  1. sea
  2. (figuratively) sea; vast number or quantity

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *mura (*murɜ) (bit, crumb; crumble, crack). [1][2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mar

  1. (transitive) to bite

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #566 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Gábor Zaicz, Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete, Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, ISBN 963 7094 01 6

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

mar n (genitive singular mars, no plural)

  1. bruise, contusion

DeclensionEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

mar (plural mares)

  1. sea

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish immar.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mar

  1. because
  2. as

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

mar (triggers lenition of a following consonant)

  1. like

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mar m

  1. (form of mare used in poetry and in names of some seas) sea

Derived termsEdit


KurdishEdit

NounEdit

mar m

  1. snake
  2. marriage

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mar

  1. rafsi of manri.

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic مَرٌَ (márra).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mar (imperfect imur)

  1. go

ConjugationEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare.

NounEdit

mar f (plural mars)

  1. sea (large body of water)

Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mar

  1. alternative form of mare

AdverbEdit

mar

  1. alternative form of mare

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare (sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mar m

  1. sea

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: mar
  • Portuguese: mar

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pt

mar

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mar (sea), from Latin mare (sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri (sea).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mar m (plural mares)

  1. sea
  2. (figuratively) a multitude; a great amount or number of things

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

Noun 1Edit

mar f (plural mars)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sea

Noun 2Edit

mar m (plural mars)

  1. (Vallader) sea

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

mar

  1. as
  2. like

Usage notesEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *marъ

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mȃr m (Cyrillic spelling ма̑р)

  1. (rare) diligence
  2. (rare) eagerness, zeal

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare (sea), from Proto-Indo-European *móri.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɾ/
  • Hyphenation: mar

NounEdit

mar m, f (plural mares)

  1. sea
  2. seaside

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

AbbreviationEdit

mar

  1. March; Abbreviation of mars.

See alsoEdit


Torres Strait CreoleEdit

NounEdit

mar

  1. (western dialect) a person's shadow

SynonymsEdit

  • mari (eastern dialect)

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mare, from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Compare Italian mare.

NounEdit

mar m (plural mari)

  1. sea

West FrisianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Frisian mere, from Proto-Germanic *mari, from Proto-Indo-European *móri. Compare English mere, Dutch meer, Low German Meer, meer, German Meer.

NounEdit

mar c

  1. lake

Etymology 2Edit

AdverbEdit

mar

  1. only, solely

ConjunctionEdit

mar

  1. but

ZazakiEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: mar

NounEdit

mar

  1. (zoology) snake