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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin opprobrium (reproach, disgrace), first attested [1656], from opprobrō (reproach, taunt), from ob (against) + probrum (disgrace, dishonor).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opprobrium (countable and uncountable, plural opprobriums or opprobria)

  1. Disgrace arising from exceedingly shameful conduct; ignominy.
  2. Scornful reproach or contempt.
  3. A cause of shame or disgrace.

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LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From opprobrō +‎ -ium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opprobrium n (genitive opprobriī or opprobrī); second declension

  1. reproach, taunt
  2. scandal, disgrace, dishonour, shame

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative opprobrium opprobria
Genitive opprobriī
opprobrī1
opprobriōrum
Dative opprobriō opprobriīs
Accusative opprobrium opprobria
Ablative opprobriō opprobriīs
Vocative opprobrium opprobria

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

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