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See also: Situation

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French situation, from Medieval Latin situatio (position, situation), from situare (to locate, place), from Latin situs (a site).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: sĭt-yo͞o-ā'shən, IPA(key): /sɪtjuːˈeɪʃən/, /sɪtʃuˈ(w)eɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

NounEdit

situation (plural situations)

  1. The way in which something is positioned vis-à-vis its surroundings.
    The Botanical Gardens are in a delightful situation on the river bank.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      ...he being naturally an underground animal by birth and breeding, the situation of Badger's house exactly suited him and made him feel at home; while the Rat, who slept every night in a bedroom the windows of which opened on a breezy river, naturally felt the atmosphere still and oppressive.
  2. The place in which something is situated; a location.
    • 1833, Thomas Hibbert and Robert Buist, The American Flower Garden Directory, page 142:
      [Hibíscus] speciòsus is the most splendid, and deserves a situation in every garden.
  3. Position or status with regard to conditions and circumstances.
  4. The combination of circumstances at a given moment; a state of affairs.
    The United States is in an awkward situation with debt default looming.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, in The Celebrity:
      Then we relapsed into a discomfited silence, and wished we were anywhere else. But Miss Thorn relieved the situation by laughing aloud, and with such a hearty enjoyment that instead of getting angry and more mortified we began to laugh ourselves, and instantly felt better.
  5. (Britain, dated) A position of employment; a post.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin 2006, page 78:
      When he was nineteen, he suddenly left the 'Co-op' office, and got a situation in Nottingham.
    • 1946, Vaughn Horton, Denver Darling, Milt Gabler, Choo Choo Ch'Boogie:
      You take a morning paper from the top of the stack
      And read the situations from the front to the back
      The only job that's open need a man with a knack
      So put it right back in the rack Jack.
  6. A difficult or unpleasant set of circumstances; a problem.
    Boss, we've got a situation here...

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Source for the definitions:
    • Dictionary.com. The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. [1] (accessed: March 10, 2007).
  • situation in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • situation in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • situation at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

situer +‎ -ation

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

situation f (plural situations)

  1. situation (all meanings)

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɪtvaˈɧuːn/, /sɪtɵaˈɧuːn/
  • (file)

NounEdit

situation c

  1. a situation

DeclensionEdit

Declension of situation 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative situation situationen situationer situationerna
Genitive situations situationens situationers situationernas

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit