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EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English (ca. 1300), from Old French ordenance (Modern French ordonnance) "decree, command", from Middle Latin ordinantia, from ordinans, the present participle of Latin ordinare "put in order" (whence ordain).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɔːd.nənts/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɔɹd.nəns/, /ˈɔɹ.dɪ.nəns/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ordinance (plural ordinances)

  1. A local law (US)
  2. An edict or decree, authoritative order.
    1. (England) Prior to the Third English Civil War, a decree of Parliament.
    2. (Britain, pre-1992 universities, Commonwealth of Nations) Detailed legislation that translates the broad principles of the university's charter and statutes into practical effect.
  3. A religious practice or ritual prescribed by the church.

Usage notesEdit

This word is sometimes confused with ordnance, or military weaponry.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit