override

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English overriden, from Old English oferrīdan, equivalent to over- +‎ ride. Cognate with Dutch overrijden, German überreiten, Danish override.

Pronunciation 1Edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əʊ.vəˈɹaɪd/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /oʊ.vəɹˈɹaɪd/

VerbEdit

override (third-person singular simple present overrides, present participle overriding, simple past overrode, past participle overridden)

  1. To ride across or beyond something.
    • 2021 October 20, “Network News: Commuter train crashes into buffers at Enfield Town”, in RAIL, number 942, page 8:
      Around 50 people were evacuated from a rush-hour London Overground service on October 12, after an eight-car train overrode the buffers at Enfield Town station.
  2. To ride a horse too hard.
  3. To counteract the normal operation of something; to countermand with orders of higher priority.
    The Congress promptly overrode the president's veto, passing the bill into law.
  4. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  5. (object-oriented programming) To define a new behaviour of a method by creating the same method of the superclass with the same name and signature.
    How the cat runs is defined in the method run() of the class Cat, which overrides the same method with the same signature of superclass called Mammal.

Usage notesEdit

  • The form overrode is sometimes used as a past participle, in place of the standard overridden.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Pronunciation 2Edit

NounEdit

override (plural overrides)

  1. A mechanism, device or procedure used to counteract an automatic control.
  2. A royalty.
  3. A device for prioritizing audio signals, such that certain signals receive priority over others.
  4. (object-oriented programming) A method with the same name and signature as a method in a superclass, which runs instead of that method, when an object of the subclass is involved.

TranslationsEdit