palatine

See also: Palatine

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French palatin (palatine), from Old French, from Medieval Latin palatinus (“imperial, imperial official“, originally “of or belonging to the Palatium“), from Latin palatium (“palace”“, originally a proper noun, “the Palatine Hill“). Doublet of paladin.

 
Part of the Imperial Palace complex on the Palatine Hill overlooking the Circus Maximus.

AdjectiveEdit

palatine (not comparable)

  1. (chiefly as postmodifier) Designating a territory in England (and, later, other countries) whose lord had specific royal privileges, or designating a modern administrative area corresponding to such a territory. [from 15th c.]
  2. (historical, chiefly as postmodifier) Designating a ruler or feudal lord with direct powers held from the sovereign. [from 15th c.]
  3. Pertaining to the Elector Palatine or the German Palatinate or its people. [from 16th c.]
    • 2016, Peter H. Wilson, The Holy Roman Empire, Penguin 2017, p. 122:
      Internally, the Palatine government remained dominated by Calvinists who bullied the largely Lutheran population, persecuted Jews and refused dialogue with Catholics.
  4. Pertaining to a palace, particularly for the Eastern and Western Roman emperors; palatial. [from 16th c.]

NounEdit

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. A feudal lord (a count palatine or Pfalzgraf) or a bishop possessing palatine powers. [from 16th c.]
  2. A palace official, especially in an imperial palace; the chief minister. [from 16th c.]
  3. (historical) A county palatine, a palatinate. [from 16th c.]
  4. (rare, obsolete) A resident of a palatinate. [17th c.]
  5. (in the plural, historical) The Roman soldiers of the imperial palace; praetorians. [from 17th c.]
  6. (historical) A type of shoulder cape for women. [from 17th c.]
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French palatin (relating to the palate), from Latin palatum (palate).

AdjectiveEdit

palatine (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Of or relating to the palate or to a palatine bone

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. (anatomy) One of a pair of bones behind the palate

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ‘Princess Palatine’ Anne Gonzaga, who popularised the garment.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

palatine f (plural palatines)

  1. (historical) tippet, shoulder cape

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

palatine f pl

  1. feminine plural of palatino

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

palātīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of palātīnus