See also: Royal

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English royal, from Old French roial (Modern French royal), from Latin rēgālis, from rēx (king). Doublet of regal (befitting a king), real (unit of currency), ariary, and riyal. Cognate with Spanish real. Displaced native Old English cynelīċ.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

royal (comparative royaler or royaller, superlative royalest or royallest)

  1. Of or relating to a monarch or his (or her) family.
    • 1909, Archibald Marshall [pseudonym; Arthur Hammond Marshall], “A Court Ball”, in The Squire’s Daughter, New York, N.Y.: Dodd, Mead and Company, published 1919, →OCLC, page 9:
      He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again her partner was haled off with a frightened look to the royal circle, []
    • 2011, Marilyn Price, Grandma's Cookies, page 7:
      On the first Friday morning of his kingship he went into the kitchen and called for his royal chef.
  2. Having the air or demeanour of a monarch; illustrious; magnanimous; of more than common size or excellence.
  3. (nautical) In large sailing ships, of a mast right above the topgallant mast and its sails.
    royal mast;  royal sail
  4. (boxing, military) Free-for-all, especially involving multiple combatants.
  5. (informal) Used as an intensifier.
    a royal pain in the neck
  6. (chess) Describing a piece which, if captured, results in loss of game.
    Maharajah and the Sepoys pits a single royal amazon for white against a standard chess army for black.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Noun edit

royal (plural royals)

  1. (somewhat informal, often capitalised) A royal person; a member of a royal family.
    • 2022 September 21, Philip Haigh, “Comment: Her Majesty's final journey”, in RAIL, number 966, page 3:
      Andy noted in RAIL 462: "The Royals are bound to have a great say in the decoration of the train and it speaks volumes for their regard for it that there are so many portraits of previous Royal Trains and items presented on trips. I sense they're extremely fond of it."
  2. (paper, printing) A standard size of printing paper, measuring 25 by 20 inches.
  3. (paper) A standard size of writing paper, measuring 24 by 19 inches.
  4. (dated) The Australian decimal currency intended to replace the pound in 1966; was changed to "dollar" before it was actually circulated.
  5. Any of various lycaenid butterflies.
  6. The fourth tine of an antler's beam.
  7. A stag with twelve points (six on each antler).
  8. (nautical, sailing) In large sailing ships, square sail over the topgallant sail.
  9. An old English gold coin, the rial.
  10. (military) A small mortar.
  11. (card games) In auction bridge, a royal spade.
  12. A tuft of beard on the lower lip.
    Synonym: imperial
  13. (campanology) Bell changes rung on ten bells.

Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ro‧yal

Noun edit

royal m or f (plural royals, diminutive [please provide])

  1. royal

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French roial, from Old French roial, from earlier reial, real, from very early Old French (c. 880) regiel, from Latin rēgālis, from rēx (king) + -ālis. Equivalent to roi +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

royal (feminine royale, masculine plural royaux, feminine plural royales)

  1. royal

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Belarusian: рая́ль (rajálʹ)
  • Bulgarian: роя́л (rojál)
  • Lithuanian: rojalis
  • Russian: роя́ль (rojálʹ)
  • Ukrainian: роя́ль (rojálʹ)

Further reading edit

German edit

Etymology edit

From French royal, from Latin regalis. Occasionally attested in the 19th century and perhaps earlier. More regular use dates from the latter half of the 20th century, reinforced by English royal; compare die Royals (the British royal family). The derivatives Royalist, Royalismus are older in German.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /rɔˈjaːl/, [ʁɔˈjaːl], [ʁo-]
  • (file)

Adjective edit

royal (strong nominative masculine singular royaler, comparative royaler, superlative am royalsten)

  1. royal
    Synonyms: königlich, majestätisch

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch royaal (royal), from Old French roial (Modern French royal), from Latin rēgālis, from rēx (king).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈro.jal]
  • Hyphenation: ro‧yal

Adjective edit

royal

  1. (figurative) extravagant, lavish.

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French roial, from Latin rēgālis. Doublet of ryal.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

royal (plural and weak singular royalle, comparative royaller, superlative royallyst) (Late Middle English)

  1. royal, of a king,
  2. kinglike, reminiscent of a king
  3. majestic, appropriate for a king, kingly
  4. opulent, expensive, fine
  5. noble, princely

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Noun edit

royal (Late Middle English)

  1. A royal; a member of royalty.
  2. A noble; a member of nobility.

Descendants edit

References edit

Adverb edit

royal (Late Middle English)

  1. wonderfully

References edit

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French roial, from Latin rēgālem.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

royal m (feminine singular royale, masculine plural royaulx, feminine plural royales)

  1. royal (of or relating to a monarch or their family)

Descendants edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

 
  • IPA(key): (everywhere but Argentina and Uruguay) /roˈʝal/ [roˈʝal]
  • IPA(key): (Buenos Aires and environs) /roˈʃal/ [roˈʃal]
  • IPA(key): (elsewhere in Argentina and Uruguay) /roˈʒal/ [roˈʒal]

  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: ro‧yal

Noun edit

royal m or f by sense (plural royales)

  1. royal (member of the British royal family)
  2. (Chile) baking powder (dry leavening agent used in baking)

Further reading edit