partisan

See also: Partisan

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɑː.tɪˌzæn/, /ˌpɑː.tɪˈzæn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɑɹ.ɾɪ.zən/, /ˈpɑɹ.ɾə.zən/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From French partisan, from Italian partigiano (defender of a party), from parte (part). Doublet of partigiano. Attested in English from the late 15th century in the noun sense of "party adherent", and in related adjective senses from the 16th century. The "guerilla fighter" sense influenced by Serbo-Croatian partizan, Russian партиза́н (partizán), from the same source.[1] The sense of "guerilla fighter" is from c. 1690. The adjective in the military sense dates from the early 18th century.(Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

NounEdit

partisan (plural partisans)

  1. An adherent to a party or faction.
  2. A fervent, sometimes militant, supporter or proponent of a party, cause, faction, person, or idea.
  3. A member of a band of detached light, irregular troops acting behind occupying enemy lines in the ways of harassment or sabotage; a guerrilla fighter.
  4. (now rare) The commander of a body of detached light troops engaged in making forays and harassing an enemy.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

partisan (comparative more partisan, superlative most partisan)

  1. Serving as commander or member of a body of detached light troops.
    partisan officer, partisan corps
  2. Adherent to a party or faction; especially, having the character of blind, passionate, or unreasonable adherence to a party.
    They were blinded by partisan zeal.
    • 2020 June 3, Lilian Greenwood talks to Paul Stephen, “Rail's 'underlying challenges' remain”, in Rail, page 33:
      Having put partisan interests to one side, Greenwood set about making teamwork a watchword for her chairmanship, while seeking the broadest possible participation in subsequent inquiries.
  3. Devoted to or biased in support of a party, group, or cause.
    partisan politics
    • 2012 June 19, Phil McNulty, “England 1-0 Ukraine”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      England will regard it as a measure of justice for Frank Lampard's disallowed goal against Germany in Bloemfontein at the 2010 World Cup - but it was also an illustration of how they rode their luck for long periods in front of a predictably partisan home crowd.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French partizaine, from Middle French partizaine, partisanne etc., from Italian partigiana, related to Etymology 1 above (apparently because it was seen as a typical weapon of such forces).[2]

NounEdit

partisan (plural partisans)

  1. (historical) A long-handled spear with a triangular, double-edged blade having lateral projections, in some forms also used in boar hunting.
  2. (obsolete) A soldier armed with such a weapon.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ partisan, n.2 and adj.”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2005.
  2. ^ partisan, n.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford: Oxford University Press, June 2005.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian partigiano.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

partisan m (plural partisans, feminine partisane)

  1. supporter, proponent, advocate

AdjectiveEdit

partisan (feminine singular partisane, masculine plural partisans, feminine plural partisanes)

  1. partisan, partial
  2. in favour of

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French partisan.

NounEdit

partisan m (plural partisans)

  1. (Jersey) supporter

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no
 
Sovjetiske partisaner i Hviterussland i 1943 (Soviet partisans in Belarus 1943)

EtymologyEdit

From Italian partigiano, via French partisan

NounEdit

partisan m (definite singular partisanen, indefinite plural partisaner, definite plural partisanene)

  1. a partisan (member of an armed group)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Italian partigiano, via French partisan

NounEdit

partisan m (definite singular partisanen, indefinite plural partisanar, definite plural partisanane)

  1. a partisan (member of an armed group)

ReferencesEdit