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See also: Perpendicular

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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French perpendiculaire, from Old French perpendiculer, from Latin perpendiculum (plumb line).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌpɜː.pənˈdɪk.jə.lə(ɹ)/ enPR: pû"pəndĭ'kyələ(r),
  • (US) IPA(key): /pɝ.pɛnˈdɪk.ju.lɚ/, /pɝ.pənˈdɪk.jə.lɚ/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

perpendicular (comparative more perpendicular, superlative most perpendicular)

  1. (geometry) At or forming a right angle (to something).
    • 2012 March 1, Henry Petroski, “Opening Doors”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 112-3:
      A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place. Applying a force tangential to the knob is essentially equivalent to applying one perpendicular to a radial line defining the lever.
    In most houses, the walls are perpendicular to the floor.
  2. Exactly upright; extending in a straight line toward the centre of the earth, etc.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

perpendicular (plural perpendiculars)

  1. (geometry) A line or plane that is perpendicular to another.
  2. A device such as a plumb line that is used in making or marking a perpendicular line.

TranslationsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin perpendiculāris, from perpendiculum.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /pɨɾ.pẽ.di.ku.ˈlaɾ/
  • Hyphenation: per‧pen‧di‧cu‧lar

AdjectiveEdit

perpendicular (plural perpendiculares, comparable)

  1. perpendicular

NounEdit

perpendicular f (plural perpendiculares)

  1. perpendicular

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin perpendiculāris, from perpendiculum.

AdjectiveEdit

perpendicular (plural perpendiculares)

  1. perpendicular

Derived termsEdit