English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /paɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Etymology 1 edit

From archaic pie (magpie), from Old French pie, from Latin pica.

Adjective edit

 
a pied avocet

pied (comparative more pied, superlative most pied)

  1. Having two or more colors, especially black and white.
    Synonyms: bicolor, nun-coloured, particoloured, piebald
  2. Decorated or colored in blotches.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

References edit

  • pied”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

pied

  1. simple past and past participle of pi

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

pied

  1. simple past and past participle of pie

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Franco-Provençal edit

Noun edit

pied m

  1. foot

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French pied, from Old French pié, from Latin pedem. The -d was added to the spelling in Middle French after the Latin form.

Cognate with Italian piede, Catalan peu, Spanish pie, Portuguese , and further with English foot, Lithuanian pėda, Persianپا() etc.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pied m (plural pieds)

  1. (anatomy) foot
    Synonyms: (slang) panard, (informal) peton
  2. leg, foot (projection on the bottom of a piece of equipment to support it)
  3. an old unit of measure equal to 32.5 centimetres
  4. (Quebec, etc.) Translation for English foot (approx. 30.5 centimetres)
  5. (poetry) foot

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Haitian Creole: pye

Further reading edit

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French pié.

Noun edit

pied m (plural pieds)

  1. foot

Descendants edit

Volapük edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French pied.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pied (nominative plural pieds)

  1. (unit of measure) foot

Declension edit