See also: Pica, PICA, picá, pića, piča, píča, piça, pică, and picā

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pīca (magpie, jay), from the idea that magpies will eat almost anything.

NounEdit

pica (usually uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (pathology) A disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances, such as ice, clay, chalk, dirt, or sand.
    • 1986, George S Baroff, Mental retardation: nature, cause, and management:
      The three most common nonfood picas were eating of strings and rags; feces, vomit, and urine; and paper, cigarettes, and soil.
    Synonyms: allotriophagy, chthonophagia, cittosis, geophagy
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Medieval Latin pica (pica: a service book), possibly from Latin pīca (magpie) after the piebald appearance of the typeset page (cf. pie (disordered type)). The relation to the printer's measure is unclear, as no edition of the text in pica type is known. The French pica derives from English rather than vice versa.[1]

NounEdit

pica (countable and uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (typography, printing, uncountable) A size of type between small pica and English, now standardized as 12-point.
    • 1790, James Boswell, in Danziger & Brady (eds.), Boswell: The Great Biographer, Yale 1989, p. 30:
      I had been at Baldwin's before dinner in consequence of a letter from him which showed me that, by using a pica instead of an English letter in printing my book, I might comprise it within such a number of sheets as a guinea-volume should contain [] .
  2. (typography, uncountable, usually with qualifier) A font of this size.
  3. (typography, countable) A unit of length equivalent to 12 points, officially 3583 cm (0.166 in) after 1886 but now (computing) 16 in.
    Coordinate terms: cicero, em, en, point
  4. (uncommon, ecclesiastical) A pie or directory: the book directing Roman Catholic observance of saints' days and other feasts under various calendars.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

pica (plural picas)

  1. Archaic form of pika (small lagomorph).
    • 1895, Richard Lydekker, The Royal Natural History (volume 3, page 190)
      Most travellers in the Himalaya are familiar with the pretty little Rodents, known as picas, tailless hares, or mouse-hares, which may be seen in the higher regions []

Etymology 4Edit

From Latin

NounEdit

pica (plural picas)

  1. A magpie.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Oxford English Dictionary, 3rd ed. "pica, n.1" & "pica, n.2". Oxford University Press (Oxford), 2006.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Latin pīla (mortar), with an unexplained change from /l/ to /k/. Compare Spanish pila (sink, font).

NounEdit

pica f (plural piques)

  1. bowl
    pica beneitera(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  2. sink
    Synonym: lavabo
    de mica en mica s'omple la pica (proverb)(please add an English translation of this usage example)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Spanish pica (pike).

NounEdit

pica f (plural piques)

  1. (weaponry) pike
  2. (card games) spade

Etymology 3Edit

Latin pīca (magpie)

NounEdit

pica f (uncountable)

  1. (pathology) pica (disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances)

Etymology 4Edit

Deverbal of picar

NounEdit

pica f (plural piques)

  1. peak, summit
    Synonyms: pic, cim, cima

Etymology 5Edit

From French pika, from an Evenki word.

NounEdit

pica f (plural piques)

  1. pika (small, furry mammal)

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

NounEdit

pica m (plural picas)

  1. pipit
  2. (card games) spade (a playing card of the suit spades, picas)

VerbEdit

pica

  1. third-person singular present indicative of comer
  2. second-person singular imperative of comer

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

pica f (plural piche)

  1. picacismo
  2. magpie

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *(s)peyk- (woodpecker; magpie), whence also Latin pīcus (woodpecker). Romance forms in -e- might reflect a different etymon, such as the Umbrian peico (acc.sg.), where the product of /ei/'s monophthongisation coincided with the latin /ē/. Cognate to Sanskrit पिक (piká, cuckoo), German Specht (woodpecker), Swedish spett (crowbar, skewer; kind of woodpecker).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pīca f (genitive pīcae); first declension

  1. magpie

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pīca pīcae
Genitive pīcae pīcārum
Dative pīcae pīcīs
Accusative pīcam pīcās
Ablative pīcā pīcīs
Vocative pīca pīcae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • pica in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pica in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pica in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

LatvianEdit

 
pica

NounEdit

pica f (4th declension)

  1. pizza

DeclensionEdit


Old PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *piťa.

NounEdit

pica f

  1. fodder, forage

DescendantsEdit

  • Polish: picować originally "to forage (demand fodder for army)", then "to bother someone", now "to try and dupe someone", "to pull the wool over someone's eyes"
    • Polish: pic back-formation from "picować"

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Back-formation from picar

NounEdit

pica f (plural picas)

  1. (Brazil, slang) dick; prick; penis
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:penis/translations
  2. (Portugal, childish) jab (medical injection)
    Synonym: vacina
  3. (Portugal, colloquial) energy; power
    Já estou com a pica toda.I'm full of energy.
  4. (Portugal, colloquial) enthusiasm, will
    Falta-me pica para continuar o projetoI'm lacking enthusiasm to continue with the project.

pica m (plural picas)

  1. (Portugal, informal) ticket inspector
    Synonym: revisor

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English pic.

NounEdit

pica f (plural picas)

  1. (Brazil, Internet slang) pic (short for picture, meaning image)

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

pica

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of picar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of picar

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pic. Compare also Aromanian chicu, chicare.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

a pica (third-person singular present pică, past participle picat1st conj.

  1. (of a liquid) to drip
    Synonym: picura
  2. (literally and figuratively) to fall
    Synonym: cădea
  3. to fail
  4. to come unexpectedly

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Hypocoristic form derived from pízda (cunt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pǐːtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

NounEdit

píca f (Cyrillic spelling пи́ца)

  1. (vulgar, hypocoristic) cunt, pussy
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Italian pizza.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pîtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

NounEdit

pȉca f (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ца)

  1. pizza
DeclensionEdit

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian pizza.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pìːt͡sa/, /píːt͡sa/

NounEdit

pīca f

  1. pizza

InflectionEdit

Feminine, a-stem
nom. sing. píca
gen. sing. píce
singular dual plural
nominative píca píci píce
accusative píco píci píce
genitive píce píc píc
dative píci pícama pícam
locative píci pícah pícah
instrumental píco pícama pícami

Further readingEdit

  • pica”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pica f (plural picas)

  1. pike, lance
  2. pick (digging tool)
  3. (card games) spade (a playing card of the suit spades, picas)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Suits in Spanish · palos (layout · text)
       
corazones diamantes picas tréboles

VerbEdit

pica

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of picar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of picar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of picar.

Further readingEdit