See also: Pica, piča, and píča

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pīca (magpie, jay) (from the idea that magpies will eat almost anything).

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Wikipedia

NounEdit

pica (usually uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (medicine) A disorder characterized by craving and appetite for non-edible substances, such as ice, clay, chalk, dirt, or sand.
    • 1986, George S Baroff, Mental retardation: nature, cause, and management:
      The three most common nonfood picas were eating of strings and rags; feces, vomit, and urine; and paper, cigarettes, and soil.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

The printing senses are probably from named the obsolete service book, which used this type size (compare canon and brevier) [1]. In turn seemingly from Latin pīca (magpie), after the piebald appearance of the typeset page (compare pie (disordered type)).

NounEdit

pica (countable and uncountable, plural picas)

  1. (typography, uncountable) A size of type.
  2. (typography, countable) A unit of measure equivalent to 12 points.
    1. The traditional British and American pica, about 4.22 mm, or 0.166 in (close to 1/6 of an inch).
    2. The PostScript pica, 1/6 of an inch.
  3. (obsolete) A Roman Catholic service book; a type of ecclesiastical calendar book.
Derived termsEdit
  • pica point
See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

pica (plural picas)

  1. Archaic form of pika. (small rodent)
    • 1895, Richard Lydekker, The Royal Natural History (volume 3, page 190)
      Most travellers in the Himalaya are familiar with the pretty little Rodents, known as picas, tailless hares, or mouse-hares, which may be seen in the higher regions []

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Type Foundry blog: Type bodies compared

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

pica f (plural piques)

  1. bowl
  2. sink

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pīca f (genitive pīcae); first declension

  1. magpie

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative pīca pīcae
genitive pīcae pīcārum
dative pīcae pīcīs
accusative pīcam pīcās
ablative pīcā pīcīs
vocative pīca pīcae

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pic. Compare also Aromanian chicu, chicare.

VerbEdit

a pica (third-person singular present pică, past participle picat1st conj.

  1. (of a liquid) to drip
  2. (literally and figuratively) to fall
  3. to fail
  4. to come unexpectedly

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Hypocoristic form derived from pízda (cunt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pǐːtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

NounEdit

píca f (Cyrillic spelling пи́ца)

  1. (vulgar, hypocoristic) cunt, pussy
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Italian pizza.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pîtsa/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧ca

NounEdit

pȉca f (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ца)

  1. pizza
DeclensionEdit

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Italian pizza.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpìːtsa/, /ˈpíːtsa/
  • Tonal: píca, pȋca

NounEdit

píca f (genitive píce, nominative plural píce)

  1. pizza

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

pica f (plural picas)

  1. pike, lance
  2. pick (digging tool)
  3. (card games) spade

Derived termsEdit

  • sacar picas

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

pica

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of picar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of picar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of picar.
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:06