English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Latin plēbs (the plebeian class), variant of earlier plēbēs. Later also understood as the plural of pleb.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plebs

  1. plural of pleb

Noun edit

plebs pl (plural only)

  1. (historical) The plebeian class of Ancient Rome.
    Synonym: plebeiate
  2. The common people, especially (derogatory) the mob.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:commonalty
    • a. 1657, George Daniel, "The Author" in Poems, Vol. II, p. 131:
      For 'tis an Easier Thing
      To make Trees Leape, and Stones selfe-burthens bring
      (As once Amphion to the walls of Thæbes,)
      Then Stop the giddie Clamouring of Plebs...
    • 1993, Max Cavalera, "Refuse/Resist", Sepultura, Chaos A.D.
      Chaos A.D. / Tanks On The Streets / Confronting Police / Bleeding The Plebs
    • 2000, James Fentress, chapter 1, in Rebels & Mafiosi: Death in a Sicilian Landscape:
      The history of Palermo was punctuated by such uprisings; when they happened, the great barons simply fled to the safety of their country villas, leaving the urban plebs free to sack their palaces in the city.
    • 2009, Erica Benner, chapter 8, in Machiavelli's Ethics:
      The lesser plebs are not unscrupulous troublemakers.

Usage notes edit

Although the Latin plebs was usually declined as a singular group noun, English plebs is usually treated as grammatically plural in all its senses.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

References edit

Czech edit

Noun edit

plebs m inan

  1. plebs, commoners

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • plebs in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • plebs in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin plēbs.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /plɛps/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: plebs

Noun edit

plebs n (uncountable)

  1. (derogatory) plebs, rabble, riffraff
    Synonyms: gepeupel, gespuis, grauw, tuig van de richel
  2. (historical) plebs, commoners (non-aristocratic class in ancient Rome, esp. during the Roman Republic)

Related terms edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Latin plēbēs, from Proto-Italic *plēðwēs (whence Oscan 𐌐𐌋𐌝𐌚𐌓𐌉𐌊𐌔 (plífriks, plebeian, nom. sg.) via *plēðros), from Proto-Indo-European *pl̥h₁dʰwḗh₁s ~ *pl̥h₁dʰuh₁és (whence Ancient Greek πληθῡ́ς (plēthū́s, crowd)) from *pleh₁- (fill), whence pleō. See also populus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plēbs f (genitive plēbis); third declension

  1. (countable and uncountable) plebeians, common people

Declension edit

Third-declension noun (i-stem or imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative plēbs plēbēs
Genitive plēbis plēbium
plēbum
Dative plēbī plēbibus
Accusative plēbem plēbēs
plēbīs
Ablative plēbe plēbibus
Vocative plēbs plēbēs

The non-i-stem variant is found in Medieval Latin.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

From *plēbānus:

Early borrowings:

Modern borrowings:

References edit

  • plebs”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • plebs”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • plebs in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • plebs in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • one of the people: homo plebeius, de plebe
    • to get oneself admitted as a plebeian: traduci ad plebem (Att. 1. 18. 4)
    • to transfer oneself from the patrician to the plebeian order: transitio ad plebem (Brut. 16. 62)
    • to transfer oneself from the patrician to the plebeian order: traductio ad plebem
    • to stir up the lower classes: plebem concitare, sollicitare
    • to hold the people in one's power, in check: plebem continere
    • (ambiguous) the dregs of the people: faex populi, plebis, civitatis
    • (ambiguous) a demagogue, agitator: plebis dux, vulgi turbator, civis turbulentus, civis rerum novarum cupidus
    • (ambiguous) the plebeian tribunes, whose persons are inviolable: tribuni plebis sacrosancti (Liv. 3. 19. 10)
    • (ambiguous) to appeal to the plebeian tribunes against a praetor's decision: appellare tribunos plebis (in aliqua re a praetore) (Liv. 2. 55)
  • plebs”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “plēbs”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), page 494
  • Walther von Wartburg (1928–2002), “plēbs”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 9: Placabilis–Pyxis, page 55

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin plēbs.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

plebs m inan

  1. (collective, derogatory) plebs (common people, hoi polloi, the mob)
  2. (collective, historical, Ancient Rome) plebs (plebeian class of Ancient Rome)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • plebs in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • plebs in Polish dictionaries at PWN