Open main menu
See also: plèbe

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin plēbs (the plebeian class), probably via Middle French plebe (plebeians, commoners, the rabble) and possibly later understood as a clipping of plebeian. Cognate with Italian plebe, Spanish plebe, Portuguese plebe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plebe (plural plebes)

  1. (historical, usually plural) A plebeian, a member of the lower class of Roman citizens.
    • 1583, Thomas Smith, De Republica Anglorum, Vol. I, Ch. xvi:
      The patricij many yeares excluding the plebes from bearing rule, vntill at last all magistrates were made common betweene them.
  2. (historical, obsolete) The plebs, the plebeian class.
    • 1612, Thomas Heywood, An Apology for Actors, Ch. ii:
      All other roomes were free for the plebe or multitude.
  3. (obsolete) The similar lower class of any area.
  4. (US, slang) A freshman cadet at a military academy.
    • 1834 October, Military & Naval Magazine, p. 85:
      My drill master, a young stripling, told me I was not so ‘gross’ as most other pleibs, the name of all new cadets.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin plēbem, accusative form of plēbs. Compare the doublet pieve.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈplɛ.be/, [ˈpl̺ɛːbe]
  • Hyphenation: plè‧be

NounEdit

plebe f (plural plebi)

  1. Common people
  2. rabble, riffraff

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

plēbe

  1. ablative singular of plēbs

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

plebe f (plural plebes)

  1. plebs (the common people)

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin plēbs, plēbis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈplebe/, [ˈpleβe]

NounEdit

plebe f (plural plebes)

  1. plebeians, common people
  2. (historical) plebs

plebe m, f (plural plebes)

  1. (colloquial, Sinaloa, Sonora, Mexico) kid, child

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit