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AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A formation from plas.

NounEdit

ples f

  1. genitals of the she-mule
Related termsEdit

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

Noun 1Edit

ples m

  1. ball (formal dance)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Noun 2Edit

ples

  1. genitive plural of pleso

InterlingueEdit

VerbEdit

ples (invariable)

  1. (with infinitive) please

LatinEdit

PijinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English place, from Middle English place, conflation of Old English plæse, plætse, plæċe (place, an open space, street) and Old French place (place, an open space), both from Latin platea (plaza, wide street), from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa).

NounEdit

ples

  1. place; location
    • 1988, Geoffrey Miles White, Bikfala faet: olketa Solomon Aelanda rimembarem Wol Wo Tu[1], page 75:
      Bihaen hemi finisim skul blong hem, hemi go minista long sios long ples blong hem long 'Areo.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From plésati.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plȇs m (Cyrillic spelling пле̑с)

  1. dance
  2. dance, ball (a social gathering where people dance)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ples” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SloveneEdit

 
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plẹ̑s m inan

  1. dance

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. plés
gen. sing. plésa
singular dual plural
nominative plés plésa plési
accusative plés plésa plése
genitive plésa plésov plésov
dative plésu plésoma plésom
locative plésu plésih plésih
instrumental plésom plésoma plési

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English place, from Middle English place, conflation of Old English plæse, plætse, plæċe (place, an open space, street) and Old French place (place, an open space), both from Latin platea (plaza, wide street), from Ancient Greek πλατεῖα (plateîa).

NounEdit

ples

  1. place
  2. village; town
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:25:
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  3. region

Derived termsEdit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.