See also: pondré

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin pōnere, present active infinitive of pōnō, from Proto-Italic *posnō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pondre (first-person singular present ponc, past participle post)

  1. to lay (an egg)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pondre, inherited from Latin pōnere, present active infinitive of pōnō, from Proto-Italic *posnō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɔ̃dʁ/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

pondre

  1. to lay (eggs)
    • 1997, Le Courrier de la nature, number 161-174, page 149:
      A noter que la caouanne, Caretta caretta, semble effectivement ne plus pondre en Corse, l'espèce n'a pas complètement disparu des côtes de France où, chaque année, quelques individus sont capturés involuntairement par des engins de pêche.
      It should be noted that the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta, no longer seems to lay eggs in Corsica, but the species has not completely disappeared from French coastlines where, each year, several individuals are caught unintentionally in fishing apparatus.
  2. (slang, France) to give birth

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French pondre, from Latin pōnō, pōnere (place, put, lay).

VerbEdit

pondre

  1. (Jersey) to lay (eggs)

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pōnere, present active infinitive of pōnō.

VerbEdit

pondre

  1. to lay (eggs)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: pondre
  • Norman: pondre
  • Walloon: ponre

Further readingEdit