See also: Ponte, pónte, and ponté

Asturian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pōns, pontem.

Noun edit

ponte f (plural pontes)

  1. bridge

Basque edit

Noun edit

ponte

  1. font

French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Nominalized form of an old past participle of pondre.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ponte f (plural pontes)

  1. laying of eggs[2]
  2. laying season[2]
    Synonym: pondaison

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

ponte m (plural pontes)

  1. "punter (cards)"[3]
  2. a person of influence, a mogul

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

ponte

  1. inflection of ponter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

References edit

  1. ^ ponte”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.
  2. 2.0 2.1 [1].
  3. ^ [2].

Further reading edit

Galician edit

 
Ponte (bridge) over the Navia river

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese ponte f, from Latin pōns, pontem m. Compare Portuguese ponte f and Spanish puente m.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈpontɪ], (eastern) [ˈpɔntɪ]
  • (file)

Noun edit

ponte f (plural pontes)

  1. bridge
  2. (nautical) bridge; the deck from which a ship is controlled
  3. the crossbeam of a yoke
  4. long weekend; a day which falls between two work-free days (holidays or weekend days), on which leave is preferred

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • ponte” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • ponte” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • ponte” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ponte” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ponte” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Interlingua edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ponte (plural pontes)

  1. bridge

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pontem, from Proto-Indo-European *pónteh₁s (path, road), from *pent- (path). Compare French pont, Romanian punte, Romansch punt, Spanish puente.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ponte m (plural ponti)

  1. bridge (structure)
  2. deck (nautical and aviation)
  3. long weekend; a day which falls between two work-free days (holidays or weekend days), on which leave is preferred

Adjective edit

ponte (invariable)

  1. (relational) transition; bridging, transitional
    • 2020 October 10, Valentina Conte, Giovanna Vitale, “Di Maio in pressing: "I soldi del Recovery servono al più presto" [Di Maio in pressing: "The money from the Recovery are needed as soon as possible"]”, in la Repubblica[3]:
      Il ministro dell'Economia Roberto Gualtieri condivide l'analisi, promette altre misure-ponte in manovra, prima che arrivino i fondi Ue.
      The Economy Minister Roberto Gualtieri shares the analysis, promises other transition measures in the maneuver, before the EU funds arrive.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

See pontus

Noun edit

ponte

  1. vocative singular of pontus

Etymology 2 edit

See pons

Noun edit

ponte

  1. ablative singular of pōns

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin pontem m.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ponte f

  1. spring (water source)
  2. fountain

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Galician: ponte f
  • Portuguese: ponte f

Portuguese edit

 ponte on Portuguese Wikipedia
 
ponte

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese ponte f, from Latin pontem m, from Proto-Indo-European *pónteh₁s (path, road), from *pent- (path). Compare Galician ponte f and Spanish puente m.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: pon‧te

Noun edit

ponte f (plural pontes)

  1. bridge (construction or natural feature that spans a divide)
  2. (medicine) bypass (a passage created around a damaged organ)
    Synonym: bypass
  3. (figuratively) bridge (anything that connects separate things)
  4. long weekend; a day which falls between two work-free days (holidays or weekend days), on which leave is preferred

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Verb edit

ponte

  1. second-person singular imperative of poner combined with te