Last modified on 2 May 2015, at 21:01

pap

See also: PAP

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Origins unclear. Related to Middle Low German pappe, Dutch pap, Old French papa/pape, Latin pappa, Bulgarian папам (papam, to eat) and Serbo-Croatian папати/papati (to eat), among others. The relationships between these words are difficult to reconstruct.

NounEdit

pap (plural paps)

  1. (uncountable) Food in the form of a soft paste, often a porridge, especially as given to very young children.
    Pap can be made from bread boiled in milk or water.
  2. (uncountable, colloquial) Nonsense.
  3. (South Africa) Porridge.
    Pap and wors are traditionally eaten at a braai.
  4. (informal, derogatory) support from official patronage
    Treasury pap
  5. The pulp of fruit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)

AdjectiveEdit

pap (comparative more pap, superlative most pap)

  1. (slang, South Africa) Spineless, wet, without character.
    • He is so pap and boring.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pap (third-person singular simple present paps, present participle papping, simple past and past participle papped)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To feed with pap.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Beaumont and Fletcher to this entry?)

Etymology 2Edit

Middle English pappe, of uncertain origin. Perhaps form Latin papilla; or perhaps compare Old Swedish papp (breast, nipple), from Proto-Germanic *pap- (nipple), of imitative origin, or from Proto-Indo-European *pap- (pock mark, nipple); Swedish dialectal papp, pappe, Swedish patt, Danish patte, North Frisian pap, pape, papke (breast, pap).

NounEdit

pap (plural paps)

  1. (now archaic) A female breast or nipple. [from 13th c.]
    • Bible, Luke xi. 27
      the paps which thou hast sucked
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.xii:
      But th'other rather higher did arise, / And her two lilly paps aloft displayd, / And all, that might his melting hart entise / To her delights, she vnto him bewrayd [].
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.98:
      they doe not onely weare jewels at their noses, in their lip and cheekes, and in their toes, but also big wedges of gold through their paps [transl. tetins] and buttocks [].
  2. (now rare, archaic) A man's breast. [from 15th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.13:
      Adrianus the Emperour made his Physition to marke and take the just compasse of the mortall place about his pap, that so his aime might not faile him, to whom he had given charge to kill him.
  3. A rounded, nipple-like hill or peak.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Macaulay to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Shortened form of Pap smear from Georgios Papanikolaou, American physician.

NounEdit

pap (plural paps)

  1. Pap smear

Etymology 4Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

AdjectiveEdit

pap (comparative more pap, superlative most pap)

  1. (South African slang) Flat.
    I got a puncture and the wheel went pap.

Etymology 5Edit

From paparazzo

VerbEdit

pap (third-person singular simple present paps, present participle papping, simple past and past participle papped)

  1. (usually in the passive) Of a paparazzo, to take a surreptitious photograph of (someone, especially a celebrity) without their consent.
    Look, that pop star’s been papped in her bikini again!

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pap m (plural pappen, diminutive papje n)

  1. mush
  2. porridge

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of pappen
  2. imperative of pappen

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Slavic language, compare Serbo-Croatian pop, Russian поп (pop, priest), or from Romanian popă [1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pap (plural papok)

  1. priest

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Compound words

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 'popă' in August Scriban, 'Dicționaru limbii românești', Editura Institutului de Arte Grafice „Presa Bună”, Bucharest, 1939

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pap

  1. rafsi of panpi.