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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin positus, perfect participle of pōnō (put, place).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

posit (plural posits)

  1. Something that is posited; a postulate.
  2. (aviation) Abbreviation of position.

Usage notesEdit

  • (for meaning #2) Started by USAF Fighter pilots when needing to know the position of a wingman. I.e. Lead pilot would say "2-posit" and #2 would reply: "5 o'clock high".

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

posit (third-person singular simple present posits, present participle positing, simple past and past participle posited)

  1. Assume the existence of; to postulate.
    • 1908: ARISTOTLE. Metaphysics. Translated by W. D. Ross., Book 1, Part 5.
      some who posit both this cause and besides this the source of movement, which we have got from some as single and from other as twofold.
  2. Propose for consideration or study; to suggest.
  3. Put (something somewhere) firmly; to place or position.
    • 2014, James Lambert, “Diachronic stability in Indian English lexis”, in World Englishes, page 113:
      Among many Indians, however, an exonormative view, which even today posits British English as the target model, appears to be firmly in place.

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