See also: rabiés and ràbies

English edit

 
A dog infected with rabies

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin rabiēs (rage, madness, fury). Doublet of rage.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹeɪ.biːz/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪbiːz

Noun edit

rabies (uncountable)

  1. (pathology) An infectious disease caused by species of Lyssavirus that causes acute encephalitis in warm-blooded animals and people, characterised by abnormal behaviour such as biting, excitement, aggressiveness, and dementia, followed by paralysis and death.
    Synonyms: (archaic) Arctic dog disease, hydrophobia, lyssa

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Cebuano: rabis
  • Danish: rabies
  • Malay: rabies
  • Norwegian: rabies
  • Swedish: rabies
  • Tagalog: rabis

Translations edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Noun edit

rabies c (singular definite rabiesen, not used in plural form)

  1. rabies

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

References edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

rabies

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive of rabiar

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology edit

Internationalism, borrowed from Dutch rabiës, from Latin rabies (madness).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ra.ˈbi.ɛs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛs, -s
  • Hyphenation: ra‧bi‧es

Noun edit

rabies (first-person possessive rabiesku, second-person possessive rabiesmu, third-person possessive rabiesnya)

  1. (pathology, neurology) rabies: an infectious disease caused by species of Lyssavirus that causes acute encephalitis in warm-blooded animals and people, characterised by abnormal behaviour such as biting, excitement, aggressiveness, and dementia, followed by paralysis and death.
    Synonym: anjing gila

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From rabiō +‎ -iēs.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

rabiēs f (genitive rabiēī); fifth declension

  1. rage
  2. madness

Declension edit

  • The genitive singular appears as rabiēs in Lucretius. The nominative, accusative and ablative singular are the only attested forms in Classical Latin.

Fifth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative rabiēs rabiēs
Genitive rabiēī rabiērum
Dative rabiēī rabiēbus
Accusative rabiem rabiēs
Ablative rabiē rabiēbus
Vocative rabiēs rabiēs

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Reflexes of the late variant rabia:

References edit

  • rabies”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rabies”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rabies in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Spanish edit

Verb edit

rabies

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive of rabiar

Swedish edit

Noun edit

rabies c (uncountable)

  1. (medicine) rabies
    Synonym: vattuskräck

See also edit

References edit