See also: Roop

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ropen, from Old English hrōpan (to shout, proclaim; cry out, scream, howl), from Proto-Germanic *hrōpaną (to call, shout, cry), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor- (to caw, crow). Cognate with Scots roup (to shout, roar, cry out loudly), Saterland Frisian ropa (to call, shout), Dutch roepen (to shout, cry out), German rufen (to call, cry, shout), Swedish ropa (to call, cry out, shout), Icelandic hrópa (to cry out).

VerbEdit

roop (third-person singular simple present roops, present participle rooping, simple past and past participle rooped)

  1. (intransitive) To cry; shout.
  2. (intransitive, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To roar; make a great noise.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English rop, from Old English hrōp (clamor, lamentation), from Proto-Germanic *hrōpaz, *hrōpą (shout, cry), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor- (to caw, crow). Cognate with Dutch roep (a call, cry, shout), German Ruf (a call, cry, reputation), Swedish rop (call, cry, shout).

NounEdit

roop (plural roops)

  1. A cry; a call.
  2. Hoarseness.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From roop (hoarseness).

VerbEdit

roop (third-person singular simple present roops, present participle rooping, simple past and past participle rooped)

  1. (transitive, usually with up) To make hoarse.
    I am rooped up.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hrópa, from Proto-Germanic *hrōpaną.

VerbEdit

roop (preterite rooft, supine rofft)

  1. to cry out, call, shout