See also: Roar and róar

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English roren, raren, from Old English rārian (to roar; wail; lament), from Proto-Germanic *rairāną (to bellow; roar), from Proto-Indo-European *rey- (to shout; bellow; yell; bark), perhaps of imitative origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

roar (third-person singular simple present roars, present participle roaring, simple past and past participle roared)

  1. (intransitive) To make a loud, deep cry, especially from pain, anger, or other strong emotion.
    • 1700, John Dryden, Iliad
      Sole on the barren sands, the suffering chief / Roar'd out for anguish, and indulg'd his grief.
  2. To laugh in a particularly loud manner.
    The audience roared at his jokes.
  3. Of animals (especially the lion), to make a loud deep noise.
    The lioness roared to scare off the hyenas.
    • {1590 Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene Bk 1, Canto VI, XXIV, lines 6&7}
      Roaring bulls he would him make to tame.
  4. Generally, of inanimate objects etc., to make a loud resounding noise.
  5. (figurative) To proceed vigorously.
    • 2011 January 25, Phil McNulty, “Blackpool 2-3 Man Utd”, in BBC:
      United's attempt to extend their unbeaten league sequence to 23 games this season looked to be in shreds as the Seasiders - managed by Ian Holloway - roared into a fully deserved two-goal lead at the interval.
  6. (transitive) To cry aloud; to proclaim loudly.
    • 1639, John Ford, The Lady's Trial
      This last action will roar thy infamy.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 7, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.
  7. To be boisterous; to be disorderly.
    • 1724, Gilbert Burnet, History of My Own Time
      It was a mad, roaring time, full of extravagance.
  8. To make a loud noise in breathing, as horses do when they have a certain disease.
  9. (Britain Yorkshire, North Midlands, informal) to cry

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

roar (plural roars)

  1. A long, loud, deep shout, as of rage or laughter, made with the mouth wide open.
  2. The cry of the lion.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The Winkies were not a brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the Lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.
  3. The deep cry of the bull.
  4. A loud resounding noise.
    the roar of a motorbike
    • 1944, Ernie Pyle, Brave Men, University of Nebraska Press (2001), page 107:
      "Those lovely valleys and mountains were filled throughout the day and night with the roar of heavy shooting."
  5. A show of strength or character.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

roar

  1. present tense of roa.