EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English noise, from Old French noise (a dispute, wrangle, strife, noise), of uncertain origin. According to some, from Latin nausia, nausea (disgust, nausea); according to others, from Latin noxia (hurt, harm, damage, injury); but neither explanation is satisfactory in regard to either form or sense.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

noise (countable and uncountable, plural noises)

  1. Various sounds, usually unwanted or unpleasant.
    He knew that it was trash day, when the garbage collectors made all the noise.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      The heavens turn about in a most rapid motion without noise to us perceived.
    • 1959, Georgette Heyer, chapter 1, in The Unknown Ajax:
      Charles had not been employed above six months at Darracott Place, but he was not such a whopstraw as to make the least noise in the performance of his duties when his lordship was out of humour.
  2. Sound or signal generated by random fluctuations.
  3. (technology) Unwanted part of a signal.
    signal-to-noise ratio
  4. (figuratively, by extension) Unwanted fuss or bustle; useless activity.
    • 2013, R. Douglas Williamson, Straight Talk on Leadership: Solving Canada's Business Crisis:
      In order to provide coherence and confidence, the leader must dramatically turn down the noise level in the organization, eliminate any unnecessary distractions that inevitably get in the way of execution, and banish the fear of uncertainty.
  5. (genetics) The measured level of variation in gene expression among cells, regardless of source, within a supposedly identical population.
  6. Rumour or complaint.
    The problems with the new computer system are causing a lot of noise at Head Office.
    • (Can we date this quote by T. Baker and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      What noise have we had about transplantation of diseases and transfusion of blood!
    • October 13, 1711, Joseph Addison, The Spectator, No. 195
      He [Socrates] lived in Athens during the great plague, which has made so much noise through all ages.
  7. (obsolete) Music, in general; a concert; also, a company of musicians; a band.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  8. (music) A genre of rock music that uses static and other non-musical sounds, also influenced by art rock.

SynonymsEdit

See also: Thesaurus:sound

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

(Genetics meaning) "Noise in Gene Expression: Origins, Consequences, and Control." Jonathan M. Raser and Erin K. O'Shea (2005). Science. 309(5743):2010-2013.

VerbEdit

noise (third-person singular simple present noises, present participle noising, simple past and past participle noised)

  1. (intransitive) To make a noise; to sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To spread news of; to spread as rumor or gossip.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts II:
      When this was noysed aboute, the multitude cam togedder and were astonyed, because that every man herde them speake in his awne tongue.
    • 1678, John Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress from This World, to That which is to Come: [], London: Printed for Nath[aniel] Ponder [], OCLC 228725984; reprinted in The Pilgrim’s Progress as Originally Published by John Bunyan: Being a Fac-simile Reproduction of the First Edition, London: Elliot Stock [], 1875, OCLC 222146756, page 17:
      This man then meeting with Chriſtian, and having ſome inckling of him, for Chriſtians ſetting forth from the City of Deſtruction was much noiſed abroad, not only in the Town, where he dwelt, but alſo it began to be the Town-talk in ſome other places.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French noise, possibly from Latin nausia, nausea, or alternatively noxia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

noise f (plural noises)

  1. (archaic or literary) quarrel, argument

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French noise.

NounEdit

noise f (plural noises)

  1. noise

DescendantsEdit

  • French: noise

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain; according to some, from Latin nausia, nausea (disgust, nausea), compare Old Occitan nauza (noise, quarrel); according to others, from Latin noxia (hurt, harm, damage, injury); but neither explanation is satisfactory in regard to either form or sense.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

noise f (oblique plural noises, nominative singular noise, nominative plural noises)

  1. dispute, argument
  2. noise, sound

DescendantsEdit