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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch rooster (gridiron, table, list), from Middle Dutch roosten (to roast). More at roast.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

roster (plural rosters)

  1. A list of individuals or groups, usually for an organization of some kind such as military officers and enlisted personnel enrolled in a particular unit; a muster roll; a sports team, with the names of players who are eligible to be placed in the lineup for a particular game; or a list of students officially enrolled in a school or class.
    • 1959, Steam's Finest Hour, edited by David P. Morgan, Kalmbach Publishing Co., page 60, referring to the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway:
      Its 50 H-7 2-8-8-2's (30 of which found their way onto the Union Pacific roster in 1945) were simple mainly because a tunnel in the Alleghenies would not accommodate the low-pressure cylinders of any Mallet larger than a 2-6-6-2.
    • 2013, William Brinkley, The Last Ship (Penguin, →ISBN), page 132:
      [So many of] the crew, men and officers alike, read them as to make me feel safe in asserting unreservedly that the Nathan James numbered in her company more Turgenev scholars than any other vessel on the United States Navy's entire roster of ships.
  2. A list of the jobs to be done by members of an organization and often with the date/time that they are expected to do them.
    The secretary has produced a new cleaning roster for the Church over the remainder of the year.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

roster (third-person singular simple present rosters, present participle rostering, simple past and past participle rostered)

  1. To place the name of (a person) on a roster.
    I have rostered you for cleaning duties on the first Monday of each month.
    • 1959, Steam's Finest Hour, edited by David P. Morgan, Kalmbach Publishing Co., pp 18-19:
      New York Central rostered literally hundreds of engine subclassifications in contrast to the Spartan simplicity of Pennsy's ranks.
    • 1961, March, Trains Illustrated, Ian Allan Ltd., page 184:
      The Guildford-Havant and Alton lines were also employed for Waterloo-Bournemouth and Weymouth traffic; some expresses diverted via the former route had to be re-rostered for light Pacifics, as the "Merchant Navy" class is barred from the Netley line.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From rosten +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

roster

  1. (rare, Late Middle English) A roaster (a person who roasts).

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

roster m (plural rosters or roster)

  1. (baseball) roster