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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French saulver, from Old French sauver, salver, from Gallo-Romance salvar, from Late Latin salvāre, present active infinitive of salvō (I save), from Latin salvus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /so.ve/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

sauver

  1. to save, rescue; to protect
  2. (computing) to save
  3. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to escape, run away
  4. (Louisiana, Cajun French) to economize

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


HunsrikEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German sūbar, from Latin sobrius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sauver (comparative sauvrer, superlative sauvrest)

  1. clean
    Sin dein Henn sauver?
    Are your hands clean?

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sauver
masculine feminine neuter plural
Weak inflection nominative sauver sauver sauver sauvre
accusative sauvre sauver sauver sauvre
dative sauvre sauvre sauvre sauvre
Strong inflection nominative sauvrer sauvre sauvres sauvre
accusative sauvre sauvre sauvres sauvre
dative sauvrem sauvrer sauvrem sauvre

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sauver, salver, from Gallo-Romance salvar, from Late Latin salvō, salvāre (save), from Latin salvus.

VerbEdit

sauver

  1. (Jersey) to save

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin salvō, salvāre (to save), from Latin salvus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sauver

  1. to save (remove from danger)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-v, *-vs, *-vt are modified to f, s, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit